How to Cure a Wound in a Duck

by Ragtimelil

Have you ever heard of sugardine for wounds? It’s used a lot for horses but it’s a great home remedy for birds and even people as well.

I used to keep Indian runner ducks for training my herding dog puppies. I had an assortment of dogs at the time, not all of them very good with fowl. One of my ducks got bitten and I knew from experience that it most likely would become infected and the bird would die. It was the infection that would kill her, not the bite.
I didn’t want to pay for a vet visit for a duck, so I called the vet and asked if there was anything I could do to help the bird recover. She told me about sugardine. She agreed that the infection was the problem. She said that the sugar in the mix would draw the infection out. I mixed up the goop and slathered it on the bird. She made a full recovery.

What is Sugardine?

Sugar and honey have been used since ancient times to draw infection from a wound. Sugardine is a simple mix of iodine, or betadine mixed to a peanut butter consistency paste with sugar. Start with the amount of sugar you want your paste to be then add the iodine. One caution is that in bug season, it will attract flies so a wrap or bug proof shelter would be in order. I didn’t have any problems with flies.

On Myself

The next time I used it on myself. I had a wound in my hand that could have easily become infected. I wasn’t near a doctor so I remembered the sugardine. I mixed it up, put it on the wound and then wrapped it. I was positive that I could feel the cool, wet sugar drawing the heat out of the wound. My hand healed with no scar and no infection. I don’t recommend that anyone use this in place of medical attention, but for minor wounds it’s a good thing to have. It’s also important to pack it several times a day since the effectiveness will wear off.

Handy to Have

This is a traditional remedy for hoof problems, such as thrush, in horses. I’ve also read it is good for abscesses and burns. It has also been recommended for bumblefoot in chickens.

I always keep betadine or iodine on hand and I always have sugar in the pantry. I would use this on any livestock that had a wound. I’m not sure about using it on dogs unless you could wrap it or use a bucket or cone to keep them from reaching it. They’d certainly try to lick it off and synthetic iodine is poisonous. I’ve read some recommendations that say never to use on cats.

Updated: on 11/22/2012, Ragtimelil
 
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Have you ever used sugardine?


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Ragtimelil on 09/19/2012

Thanks. Yes, it's handy to know.

katiem2 on 09/19/2012

Good to know. I have a friend who takes in rescue's of all sorts. She has ducks now. This is headed her way. She lives up on lake Erie. I know she will appreciate this as she has a side variety of animals and birds. thanks :)K

Ragtimelil on 09/12/2012

Or even for humans!
Thanks Steve.

dustytoes on 09/12/2012

How very interesting! Sounds like a good idea to have these ingredients on hand if you have livestock.

zteve on 09/12/2012

Not heard of this before - interesting!

Ragtimelil on 09/11/2012

Yes, I've heard that. I've heard sugar has some of the same properties. I think the difference here is that it's easier to make a paste with sugar that will stay on the animal. And the betadine will help too.

Niniann on 09/11/2012

We used honey dressings for certain kinds of wounds in the Critical Care Unit where I worked. Many bacterias cannot grow in the presence of honey. THey have found perfectly good honey in jars in the pyramids that is thousands of years old .



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