10 Reasons Apples Are Good for You

by Mira

You all know the old saying, “An apple a day keeps the doctor away.” What you may not know is that there's more to the story than vitamins and minerals.

In fact, apples contain only a moderate amount o vitamin C (10% DV) and trace amounts of other vitamins and minerals. But they contain fiber (12%) and are low in calories (65 calories / 125 grams). So they’re a good fruit to include in your diet if you want to lose weight.

But that’s not all there is to apples. You’d want to include them in your diet even if you’re not interested to lose weight because they are incredibly good for you.

Due to their high content of flavonoids and other phytonutrients, apples may be some of the best cancer-fighting agents out there. They have other health benefits as well.

Slim Down Snacks Under 100 Calories That Keep You Feeling Full, Kindle book by Corina Tudose
Slim Down Snacks Under 100 Calories That Keep You Feeling Full

Why Are Apples Good for You? Let Me Count the Reasons . . .

1. Apples and Cardiovascular Health
Apples and Cholesterol

You may be surprised by this, but apples also lower your bad / “lousy” cholesterol (LDL) to a significant extent. A study whose results were published in the Journal of Functional Foods in October 2012 showed that an apple eaten daily for only 4 weeks lowered LDL cholesterol by 40% in healthy adults between the ages of 40 and 60. It looks huge, but that's what the study says. The effect is ascribed to polyphenols in apples, but other compounds may play a role too. And of course soluble fiber plays a role.

Another study, the results of which were published in 2011, showed that apples lower not only cholesterol, but also two other markers associated with cardiovascular diseases. So if you want to maintain healthy arteries and prevent heart disease, eat an apple a day.

2. Apples and Cancers

Studies have shown that a flavonoid in apples called quercetin reduces the risk of lung cancer. (Here's a Finnish study published in 2002 in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition that examines that correlation as well as others between intake of quercetin and other flavonoids and the risk of chronic diseases.)

Other preliminary studies have shown that quercertin inhibits the growth of other types of cancer cells as well. See an article on that and other health benefits of quercetin here.

Laboratory and animal studies by the French National Institute for Health and Medical Research have shown that other phytonutrients in apples, procyanidins, reduce the risk of colon cancer and kill cancer cells. See here for the results this research team presented in 2004.

Other compounds in apples, more specifically in apple peels, called triterpenoids, have been shown in a Cornell study of 2007 on laboratory cultures to prevent and fight human liver, colon, and breast cancer cells.

3. Apples and Alzheimer's

An apple a day also keeps Alzheimer’s at bay, according to a study on rat brain cells, the results of which were published in 2004. It’s that quercetin again.

4. Apples and Stroke

Apples and other white fruit and vegetables such as pears, bananas, cauliflower, and cucumbers, have also been connected to a lower risk of stroke, according to a Dutch study concluded in 2011 which followed 20,069 people between the ages of 20 and 65 over a one-year period.

5. Apples and Asthma

Apples may also help prevent asthma or relieve asthma symptoms.

Green Smoothie Recipes & Other Healthy Smoothie Recipes, by C Elias (Paperback Edition)
Green Smoothie Recipes & other Healthy Smoothie Recipes: ...
$9.99  $6.55
The Whole Truth Eating and Recipe Guide, by Andrea Beaman of Fed Up! Lose Weight the Healthy Way, for Good! Andrea Beaman has Excellent Recipes: Easy, Tasty, and Very Healthy!
The Whole Truth Eating and Recipe Guide
$19.95  $4.00
6. Apples and Digestion

A small, 65-calorie apple has 3 grams of fiber, which is 12 % of the recommended daily intake. Insoluble fiber helps keep you regular (and also prevents colon cancer). Soluble fiber absorbs cholesterol from the digestive tract, preventing it from making its way to the arteries.

7. Apples and Weight Loss

The soluble fiber in the pulp of the apple absorbs water and slows digestion, keeping you full longer, so you're less likely to reach for a snack. The insoluble fiber, on the other hand, present in the skin of the apple, speeds up digestion. Both kinds of fiber are good for you. Oh, and did I mention how low in calories apples are? A small apple has only 65 calories. A large one usually has up to 100.

8. Apples and Cataracts

According to a study by a team of scientists at the Harvard School of Public Health, if you have a body mass index (BMI) of over 30 you have a 36% greater risk of developing cataracts than people with a BMI of 23 or under. The results of this study were published in 2002 in The International Journal of Obesity and Related Metabolic Disorders. You can see the abstract here. It was a study on a rather large sample, of "87 682 women and 45 549 men aged 45 and older who did not have diagnosed cataract or cancer at baseline."

So eat your apples because that fiber will help you lose weight, and with that you reduce your risk of cataracts.

Learn to Cook Easy, Tasty, and Healthy Recipes with Andrea Beaman of the TV Show Fed Up! She's Wonderful!
Healthy Cooking
Only $10.99

Quick Fix Healthy Breakfasts Under 300 Calories

Kindle Edition
Quick Fix Healthy Breakfasts Under 300 Calories: That Kee...
9. Apples and Diabetes

The soluble fiber in apples prevents spikes in blood sugar levels and also lowering the average blood sugar, helping you control your diabetes. 

10. Apples and the Immune System

You may be aware that the vitamin C in apples boosts your immune system. But a study from 2010 shows that soluble fiber also impacts your immune system beneficially.

So an apple a day keeps the doctor away, indeed -- the old saying is spot-on.

With more research conducted every day, I expect we'll learn even more about the health benefits of apples.

In fact, here's one more reason why you should eat apples.

11. Apples and High Blood Pressure

Researchers at the Nova Scotia Agricultural College in Canada have shown that flavonoids in the peel of the apple help reduce high blood pressure by inhibiting an enzyme (ACE) that causes hypertension. The results of the study was published in 2012 in the journal Food Chemistry.

Try Apple and Cheese Pairings for a Snack

Or as Part of Your Breakfast

Apple and Cheese Pairing for a SnackIf you’re not particularly keen on apples, try them with blue cheese. A small apple of 125 grams with 50 grams of 20%-fat Rocquefort cheese actually makes a great snack of under 200 calories. It also works for breakfast.

You can also use apples in fruit salads, which you can enjoy in endless combinations.

Or you can simply bite into them the old-fashioned way.

Here’s to at least an apple a day!

More Info for Apple Lovers from Wizzley Authors

Nothing beats a piece of apple pie made from your own fresh apples. The trees are beautiful to look at as well!
National Apple Pie Day is a food holiday that is celebrated not once, but twice a year for double the pleasure.
A foolproof recipe for a quick, easy and delicious apple cake.

52 Delicious & Healthy Superfood Breakfasts Under 300 Calories

Kindle Edition
52 Delicious & Healthy SUPERFOOD Breakfasts Under 300 Cal...

Now That You're Eating Healthy, Remember to Exercise

A Pilates Book by Brooke Siler, Who Trained with a Protégé of Joseph Pilates
The Pilates Body: The Ultimate At-Home Guide to Strengthe...
$18.95  $4.56
Updated: 05/13/2013, Mira
Thank you! Would you like to post a comment now?


Guest on 05/27/2014

Mira, From my experience, acceptance opens the door to understanding and transformation.
Part of gaining insight is learning to process signals, which entails confusion as we learn to separate, in retrospect, emotional influences which becloud our decisions.
What counts is that you perceive where possible confusion and errors occurred and that you saw your way to "a good lettuce and green onion salad."
It all sounds good to me.

Mira on 05/27/2014

"Follow through on healthy cravings" -- good advice. Unfortunately, things like stress mess up many of those signals. I had a bad food day today. :-) Well, I did end the day with a meal accompanied by a good lettuce and green onion salad though :-)

Guest on 05/27/2014

Mira, I tend to think that I don't crave sweets but, on the other hand, I love certain fruits which are considered to be rather sweet, such as coconuts, pears, and pineapples, and hanker after them. I was thinking that it's their appearance, aroma, healthiness, taste, texture, etc., but perhaps the sweetness factor is important as well. But then I love grapefruits and lemons specifically for their tartness.
There are alternative medicine practitioners who believe that you should indeed pay attention to your body's cravings because that's the body's way of communicating. They say to follow through on healthy cravings. :-)

Mira on 05/27/2014

I hope it works for you! By the way, I always tell myself I should eat more apples. I only eat a certain fruit when I have a craving for it but often you can eat apples when you crave sweets, for instance. I keep telling myself to substitute things like that, or eat apples and pears as my father does, (seemingly) all the time.

Guest on 05/27/2014

Mira, The beauty of apples definitely, like the beauty of Elizabeth Taylor, is more than skin-deep! :-)
More and more varieties of apples are showing up in the grocery store, so I'm looking forward to enjoying them. They are all varieties that I already know, but I love the reminders and the taste comparisons.
I noted with interest an attribute which I had not noticed when I first read this article: "5. Apples and Asthma." I was plagued with respiratory concerns for almost a month in April, and, in retrospect, I'm realizing that I did not eat apples during that month. I'll keep that in mind as an inducement to favor one of my favorite fruits.

Mira on 03/10/2014

That goal sounds like something I can see for myself, too! :)

Guest on 03/10/2014

Mira, Thank you for that info. Those varieties you don't recognize also aren't known to me.
I think that I'll make it a goal to find a way to taste as many varieties of apples as possible.:-)
I've never met an apple I didn't like.

Mira on 03/10/2014

We have 100 apple varieties in Romania, cultivated here that is. As I suspected, the most widely available are Golden Delicious and Jonathan. They're followed by some varieties I don't recognize, called Starkrimson, Idared, Florina, and Golden Parmen. Florina, by the sound of it, should be a Romanian cultivar. But I've also seen other varieties, imported, such as Granny Smith and Cortland.

Guest on 03/09/2014

Mira, Apple and cheese pair well together. They present a pretty palette, and their tastes are complementary. It's great that something so delicious is so good for us as well. I've never seen apples from Romania in the stores. What varieties are available there?
I love all varieties, but especially Fuji, Gala, and Granny Smith.

Mira on 11/03/2013

I have been eating more apples lately, too. Have discovered some great golden ones from a region in Romania famous for its apples. They're such a treat. So sweet! Beats so many other desserts. And yes, I eat them for dessert. You're supposed to eat them half an hour to 45' before the meal, but I am having a really great time eating an apple for dessert -- a very healthy and low-calorie one, too.

You might also like

Salmon with Tropical Fruit and Mint

Say you think you can’t cook, but you want to make something special. Here’s ...

Popular and Fun Zazzle Custom Mugs: Tard the Grumpy Cat and More

I love custom mugs and I love Zazzle gifts. So I thought I’d bring the two to...

Disclosure: This page generates income for authors based on affiliate relationships with our partners, including Amazon, Google and others.
Loading ...