Create topic New topics

Forum

Help me, please!  

How Long For 'Wizzes' To Mature?

 
onetimeuser
Posts: 378
Message
on 07/03/2012

Hi all,

Those of you who know me will know that I'm in the process of moving 500+ former hubpages to Wizzley. 

So while it looks like I've got lots of mature Wizzley content, I have in fact got tonnes of fresh content.

I was just wondering whether the more experienced members of the site saw their content take time to mature?

I think it's clear that Wizzley as a whole is a little down at the minute, can be expected as it's a pretty new property, and most sites go through it with the Google love etc.

On Hubpages I seem to remember it taking 6 months of pretty solid publishing for things to suddenly BOOM, and after that my hubs seemed to get pretty much instant juice and do well from the off.

Does anybody have any theories about how long it takes for content to mature here?

I'm getting little bites on Amazon, had a spell of 7 sales in 3 days, then nothing for a week etc..... 

.... all the usual patience required etc etc.

It would be lovely if my content could mature a little just before xmas though!

Anything that I can get for recycled content is great, I'm open minded.... but a thousand Amazon click throughs a month and a bit of AdSense revenue wouldn't go amiss!

Jerrico_Usher
Posts: 1210
Message
on 07/03/2012

I remember the prez of HP stating that a "hub" fully matures in 3 years roughly, and he mentioned this based on 3 years observation - Wizzley is in the same 2.0 world as HP only younger so I'd think that would apply here too, all be it on HP it may be faster due to them being well seasoned for 4-5 years. That doesn't mean earnings will take 3 years but rather that the article/wizzle may take that long to reach google seasoning etc...

That said it's more of a matter of promotion. As wizzley is still pretty young I'd think if you don't promote at all you would get some traffic juice but unless your niches are popular and someone backlinks like crazy on sites like reddit and high PR's and it takes off nothing will happen until you hit that.

I too remember HP hubs after my 100th hub with two power niches that took off in 1 years time and escalated from there that all new ones were blown up fast but many didn't move at all.

Many here that have bragged about decent earnings (in the thousand(s) a month) have done external promo including using their other 2.0 properties SQ IB etc... with pointed links back to their wizzles.

The bottom line is 1. it's about the popularity of your articles and how many you have that become popular and 2. promo promo promo whether it's your own or your visitors doing you a solid (or doing themselves a solid as they need the info and or get excited and share).

Personally, I'm just going to publish and see what happens around 100, but I'm giving them 6 months to mature before I even worry about them earning- meanwhile I'm going to build articles on eza and SQ (hp isn't an option) pointing links back and I'm going to give it time- I know that syndication within the site is important as is time, it's rare that a wizzle will spike and stay there before the article is aged or by some stroke of luck a backlink leads to more links and explosion of traffic happens-

I also know comment conversations make google happy so it's good to get comments and to keep the convo going add more information that's useful in a reply comment to get others to comment back- activity is your best friend in the post panda world. Just my opinion based on my own observations... I think in a years time Wizzley will spike and by year three we'll dominate making it easier and faster to reach maturity in our wizzles...

p.s.

The more articles you have the more potent your traffic seems to be because a lot of people tend to look around after visiting one article... I noticed in 4 of my 8 100 article's published that my traffic and earnings substantially upticked- (the other 400 I added practically in the same 6 month period so they don't count as I was booted before I could see that statistic play out)... also the more articles you have the more potential backlinks you get from wizzley promoting them in internal syndication i.e. suggesting other articles the reader may like- It's a bit like playing the lottery- the more tickets you buy/have the more chances you have to win...


Jerrico Usher - The Grass May Be Greener On The Other Side But I Installed A Mirror Over There! :-) - Join Our Wizzler Chat Room created by the people for the people to the people
JoHarrington
Posts: 1816
Message
on 07/03/2012

Thank you both for having this conversation, as a lot of this is new to me.  It all adds to the learning curve.


Could I just ask what a 2.0 is please?  Re 'same 2.0 world'  and 'other 2.0 properties'.

 


onetimeuser
Posts: 378
Message
on 07/03/2012

 

JoHarrington: 03. Jul 2012, 20:59

Thank you both for having this conversation, as a lot of this is new to me.  It all adds to the learning curve.


Could I just ask what a 2.0 is please?  Re 'same 2.0 world'  and 'other 2.0 properties'.

 

web 2.0

It's just a blanket term which describes websites which rely on user generated content / user activity.

So pretty much any website that you can think of, with the exception of blogs, simple ecommerce sites, and static pages.

Facebook and twitter are web 2.0.

Wizzley can probably be considered as such due to the user generated aspect, but typically I'd apply the term to social networks etc.

Just a bit of generally meaningless terminology to describe anything built in Silicon valley rather than by you or me.

They are using 'web 3.0' now. Just lingo.

Jerrico_Usher
Posts: 1210
Message
on 07/03/2012

Actually Ryan, 2.0 or "web 2.0" refers to the interactive nature of the web. In web 1.0 sites/pages were static and there were no interactive functionality or severely limited interactive functions.

In web 2.0 of the second generation of the www, sites became interactive, at first it was just things like an email form built into the site then things like polls came out and a large variety of things that cover interactivity. The web 2.0 model introduced things we now take for granted like the comments box, voting, flagging, etc... It was the web 2.0 model that even made wizzley, hubpages, and other content profit share/page share sites possible. The content partnership sites like this are actually the embodiment of the 2.0 concept to it's full potential. If web 1.0 was 2-D web 2.0 is 3D.

Now web 3.o is not yet here but the infrastructures are beginning to take place. 3.0 is an evolution of 2.0 in the respect of the web pages understanding the information it stores or a sort of AI concept where by the pages will more readily act on information without the site's proprietors having to do anything... A good definition I found and quote is:

"Web 3.0 is a third phase in the evolution of the World Wide Web, based on the idea that the Internet 'understands' the pieces of information it stores and is able to make logical connections between them"

To use an example anyone with a cell phone can understand, think of the way the mobile networks are measured in G-1,2,3,4 or "Generation #"... which describes a major evolution in everything from the way the network responds to the hardware that makes faster data speeds possible. Like cell phone networks, the internet is evolving constantly and actually faster as it doesn't require as much hardware updates to make the net evolution possible but rather software evolution.

The web evolution is based on a major change in the actual infrastructure of the web and how people use it and how it responds to data... web 1.0 was the flat web, the "Spectator" web; 2.0 is the interactive web and 3.0 is the interactive web that includes AI or sites that can process and respond intelligently to actions/reactions of the site visitor.

Technically adsense ads are web 3.0 because of how they are placed on the page and a computer scans the page then serves the right ads and this trend continues indefinitely without any human interaction other than back end maintenance of the servers/software to continually hone the process to perfection of a goal.

Based on the definition of web 1,2,3.0 etc... I'd say it's not just terminology or chat speak, but rather in the same playing field with "generation X,y,z" or G1,2,3,4". It's important to realize this because it defines how things are done, where they are done, and the capacity to which they can be accomplished. I guess you can tell I wrote a "hub" about this :) I'll eventually move it over.

Jerrico

p.s. the reason I elaborated on this is that realizing which web your in and how it works is essential to marketing (internet marketing) prowess, it's essential to understand the sandbox your playing in and not take lightly the terminology that describes it. Static pages are web 1.0, wordpress sites are 2.0- social networking sites are also 2.0 because they embody the same principals as sites like wizzley, they just allow, process, and contain information/interactivity differently in the same way wizzley and hubpages although similar, work on different playing fields.


Jerrico Usher - The Grass May Be Greener On The Other Side But I Installed A Mirror Over There! :-) - Join Our Wizzler Chat Room created by the people for the people to the people
onetimeuser
Posts: 378
Message
on 07/03/2012

 

Jerrico_Usher: 03. Jul 2012, 22:01

Actually Ryan, 2.0 or "web 2.0" refers to the interactive nature of the web. In web 1.0 sites/pages were static and there were no interactive functionality or severely limited interactive functions.

In web 2.0 of the second generation of the www, sites became interactive, at first it was just things like an email form built into the site then things like polls came out and a large variety of things that cover interactivity. The web 2.0 model introduced things we now take for granted like the comments box, voting, flagging, etc... It was the web 2.0 model that even made wizzley, hubpages, and other content profit share/page share sites possible. The content partnership sites like this are actually the embodiment of the 2.0 concept to it's full potential. If web 1.0 was 2-D web 2.0 is 3D.

Now web 3.o is not yet here but the infrastructures are beginning to take place. 3.0 is an evolution of 2.0 in the respect of the web pages understanding the information it stores or a sort of AI concept where by the pages will more readily act on information without the site's proprietors having to do anything... A good definition I found and quote is:

"Web 3.0 is a third phase in the evolution of the World Wide Web, based on the idea that the Internet 'understands' the pieces of information it stores and is able to make logical connections between them"

To use an example anyone with a cell phone can understand, think of the way the mobile networks are measured in G-1,2,3,4 or "Generation #"... which describes a major evolution in everything from the way the network responds to the hardware that makes faster data speeds possible. Like cell phone networks, the internet is evolving constantly and actually faster as it doesn't require as much hardware updates to make the net evolution possible but rather software evolution.

The web evolution is based on a major change in the actual infrastructure of the web and how people use it and how it responds to data... web 1.0 was the flat web, the "Spectator" web; 2.0 is the interactive web and 3.0 is the interactive web that includes AI or sites that can process and respond intelligently to actions/reactions of the site visitor.

Technically adsense ads are web 3.0 because of how they are placed on the page and a computer scans the page then serves the right ads and this trend continues indefinitely without any human interaction other than back end maintenance of the servers/software to continually hone the process to perfection of a goal.

Based on the definition of web 1,2,3.0 etc... I'd say it's not just terminology or chat speak, but rather in the same playing field with "generation X,y,z" or G1,2,3,4". It's important to realize this because it defines how things are done, where they are done, and the capacity to which they can be accomplished. I guess you can tell I wrote a "hub" about this :) I'll eventually move it over.

Jerrico

p.s. the reason I elaborated on this is that realizing which web your in and how it works is essential to marketing (internet marketing) prowess, it's essential to understand the sandbox your playing in and not take lightly the terminology that describes it. Static pages are web 1.0, wordpress sites are 2.0- social networking sites are also 2.0 because they embody the same principals as sites like wizzley, they just allow, process, and contain information/interactivity differently in the same way wizzley and hubpages although similar, work on different playing fields.

"Actually Ryan, 2.0 or "web 2.0" refers to the interactive nature of the web. In web 1.0 sites/pages were static and there were no interactive functionality or severely limited interactive functions".

Yes, exactly! The user generated aspect. Web 1.0 = pages which were created by one webmaster.

But web 2.0 is a fallacy, Amazon.com had interactive elements in 1996. User reviews were automatically published without a webmaster having to receive them in an email, copy them to a page, and press publish.

Those were not static pages, they were dynamic.

So if web 2.0 is anything, it's the generation which saw dynamic elements become popular and widespread.

'web 2.0' sites didn't use any new technology, they merely used technology which had long already been possible.

A blog is the most basic of web 2.0 properties, because users can submit comments, rate posts etc.

I still consider it a piece of lingo or jargon as a result. It was never anything new, if anything it just saw more financial investment and saw the emergence of VC backed start-ups who could afford to hire computer scientists rather than one man bands who know a bit of html messing around in the bedroom.

In the late nineties there was a huge tech boom, and fancy sites started springing up, that's when 'web 2.0' was coined.

Even a Wordpress site is web 2.0, pretty much every site is web 2.0. Craigslist and Amazon were doing the 'web 2.0' thing in 1995. 

People starting saying 'web 2.0' at around the time that the .com bubble burst. 

So for me, it is merely a bit of jargon, and so is web 3.0.

Jerrico_Usher
Posts: 1210
Message
on 07/03/2012

Jerrico:

"Actually Ryan, 2.0 or "web 2.0" refers to the interactive nature of the web. In web 1.0 sites/pages were static and there were no interactive functionality or severely limited interactive functions".

Ryan:

Yes, exactly! The user generated aspect. Web 1.0 = pages which were created by one webmaster.

Jerrico:

I understand what your saying but the fact is web 2.0 sites are also built by one person or multiple people- it's not the amount of people creating the page/site but the interactivity of it that makes it web 2.0

Ryan:

But web 2.0 is a fallacy, Amazon.com had interactive elements in 1996. User reviews were automatically published without a webmaster having to receive them in an email, copy them to a page, and press publish.

Those were not static pages, they were dynamic.

Jerrico:


You  make a great point, and that falls into the "extremely limited interactivity" part of my explanation. I know there were sites that had this functionality, however only bigger sites with the money to pay programmers and even that had creative insight (or hired creativity) to create such a feature did it or could do it easily.

In any generation there are always "pioneers" that break the status quot and innovate beyond the current realm, Amazon and a few others did this, but a few sites don't constitute an entire generation shift or infrastructure evolution they are the ones that spark it - They are the innovators that spark the beginning of this growth/evolution by virtue of putting the technology out there and others who are impressed by it and want it will eventually rendition it for their own sites.

This sparks the evolutionary chain that creates the trend which is then built upon and eventually renders the current evolution obsolete as growth is not a static change but a network of changes that produce a trend that when caught on and exploded into many more like trends (voting, commenting, etc along with reviews (the first comments box essentially) becomes the next major upgrade in the system (from web 1.0 meaning the majority of sites/webmaster are creating static, non-interactive, spectator/research sites to 2.0 where the Majority of the sites/webmasters are utilizing the latest technologies and creating interactive pages).

Ryan:

So if web 2.0 is anything, it's the generation which saw dynamic elements become popular and widespread.

'web 2.0' sites didn't use any new technology, they merely used technology which had long already been possible.

A blog is the most basic of web 2.0 properties, because users can submit comments, rate posts etc.

Jerrico:

Your first statement consolidates my point above, the evolution to the next .0 IS exactly the mass adoption of a concept or group  of concepts that collectively change the entire paradigm shift.

On your second point, in reality ANYTHING is "possible" but to use it in the way you meant it, most of what is available in 2.0 technology today wasn't all invented or available yet in 1996, although some of the basic elements like the review/comments box were and just weren't applied as many didn't know how to do it or simply didn't see the need yet- too busy learning how to do basic other things in the technology of the day which being new was likely overwhelming enough at the time.

Sure it was possible, easily, but the demand wasn't yet there and thus the 2.0 technology was easily available if you were creative enough to network what was there to make it happen but the trend hadn't yet been established nor the benefits proven was needed yet... an age/generation/paradigm shift is based on it's being widely accepted and used not that it exists or is possible.

Ryan:

I still consider it a piece of lingo or jargon as a result. It was never anything new, if anything it just saw more financial investment and saw the emergence of VC backed start-ups who could afford to hire computer scientists rather than one man bands who know a bit of html messing around in the bedroom.

In the late nineties there was a huge tech boom, and fancy sites started springing up, that's when 'web 2.0' was coined.

Even a Wordpress site is web 2.0, pretty much every site is web 2.0. Craigslist and Amazon were doing the 'web 2.0' thing in 1995. 

Jerrico:

In the end it all boils down to opinion, and the terms are intangible really, they are descriptive of the collective mass use of a collection of technologies that form a evolution of a realm. Like I said yes there were sites using it, but it wasn't mainstream enough to truly be a 2.0 world, more like 1.0 then 1.5 as sites started to increasingly adopt the technology and 2.0 when the technology evolved to the point of affecting how people used the web and how it increased interactivity to the point of making the web less flat and more round (the world is flat or the world is round- see the difference?).

Ryan:

People starting saying 'web 2.0' at around the time that the .com bubble burst. 

So for me, it is merely a bit of jargon, and so is web 3.0.

Jerrico:

I respect your point and your opinion Ryan, and really enjoyed this intellectual exchange of ideas/points. I know where your coming from and understand why you feel that way. My humbled opinion, however differs in that the terms are not merely words or some kind of trend in lingo, but rather explicative of a concept and change that so drastically changes how people use, work in, create in, and utilize the web.

To me saying the distinction web 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 are just jargon is no different than stating that a college graduate with a certificate, associate, and bachelors degrees are just jargon when in fact they both (web 1,2,3 and college degrees) require evolution of skills, awareness, and determine capabilities- in other words they give someone a lot of explanation in a short term that can be collectively understood and utilized to make decisions- a degree tells a potential employer not specifically what you studied to get there but that you followed an evolution of steps to get there, web 1.0+ tells the internet marketer what they are dealing with and who their competition is and what their using- 1.0 sites can't compete with 2.0 sites in the same way as 2.0+ sites generate ranking power in part without interaction from the webmaster- commentors, flags, etc... kickstart systems that determine how the site performs and even how a site ranks- a static site takes more work on the webmasters part thus 2.0 is a much better and efficient way to do business.

Granted, in your defense, the terms don't take an active role in creating changes or instigate anything, they are just ways to consolidate understandings that lead to comprehension :) but the term itself although benign, make people ask the question- what is that, then their research leads them to learning about the realm they are trying to master- thus it can be important "Jargon" to hear.

It was hearing web 2.0 in the first place years ago that burned in me the curiosity to learn more about the evolution of the web so I could better plan my next moves. In the same light learning about the coming 3.0 web technologies now while it's still not yet changed over to that evolutionary uptick, will give you an edge over those who'd wait till EVERYONE was using it... my whole point was that it's not benign, it's an advantage to understand it- I didn't want to trivialize it to newbies who may be reading this... I think we're on the same page but I believe I see more usefulness in the concept and understanding the evolution as the past gives you clues into the future.

Great points Ryan, thanks for sharing.

Jerrico


Jerrico Usher - The Grass May Be Greener On The Other Side But I Installed A Mirror Over There! :-) - Join Our Wizzler Chat Room created by the people for the people to the people
TerriRexson
Posts: 175
Message
on 07/04/2012

My Wizzley content seems to be decaying rather than maturing! I guess I just created all my early content in the honeymoon period. Initially my Wizzley content did well from day 1 (and stayed up.) 

Now I'm seeing lots of junk in the google results above my pages. 

Generally I see older content dropping rather than rising up. And new content doesn't take off at the moment. 

I did a round of edits a few weeks ago but that didn't seem to help. 

I'm sure this is just a point in time thing though. If I was spending time working online then some of it would be on Wizzley. But I'm completely slacking! It's been nearly a year since I quit my job and I think I've finally chilled out a bit. Which was the point of me leaving work after all. 


JoHarrington
Posts: 1816
Message
on 07/04/2012

Thank you for the clarification, Jerrico and Ryan.  It sounds to me, from a laywoman point of view, like it was a bit of marketing spin to revive the industry side of things after the dom.com bubble burst. 


I understood all of the rest around it, just hadn't heard the terminology.

 

Terri, I'm sorry to hear that, but chilling out is good.  You enjoy your rest and fingers crossed on your articles making money again. <3


TerriRexson
Posts: 175
Message
on 07/04/2012

 

JoHarrington: 04. Jul 2012, 05:30

Terri, I'm sorry to hear that, but chilling out is good.  You enjoy your rest and fingers crossed on your articles making money again. <3

Thanks Jo. It's not exactly dreadful, I know a lot of people would be very happy to make what I'm still making on Wizzley. And it really is passive income at the moment! I've already made enough money from Wizzley to justify the time spent so far. And if it picks up again that's a real bonus. 

And stuff elsewhere is doing just fine.


Jerrico_Usher
Posts: 1210
Message
on 07/04/2012

@Terri - My experience has been that there are biorhythms to the web, you'll have long periods of success then equally long or longer periods of latency (traffic, clicks etc...). It's generally due to a lot of factors like hollidays, trends coming and going or other trends hijacking the spotlight (and oops no wizzles etc... in those areas so you see a drop off) but as people tend to return to old trends things pick up... I noticed that summer seems to be a pretty quiet time overall because more people are out and about enjoying the sun while winter most people don't want to drive in snow or rain and are at home surfing... but some trends do better in the summer- go figure (like where to go during the summer).

I've gotten used to not worrying about it and find that you just have to plan for the dead zones with the busy times, especially income-wise. Many of the successful internet marketers I know have a system in place for this very thing. My boss, for example does millions of dollars of business on the web and says if you don't save for the dips you panic and since there's no telling when a dip will mature back to a spike, you really have to prepare for anything.

Also in the dips you can do some searches (by doing searches I'm talking of course about using Google trends database to see a live snapshot of booming trends) to see where the trends are going and build articles based on what you find, this is about balancing your portfolio and using slow times to figure out what's missing from your line up. I've also talked to a lot of the people I know during my own dips and about half of them always tend to be up when I'm down and down when I'm up- they are on different trends so it all makes sense. One thing you get used to when you work exclusively online is that there is no steady paycheck- we do, afterall, work on commission :) but if you budget for it you don't feel any different as your paying yourself the same. I've been watching your articles pretty carefully lately as you seem to be doing pretty good...

What's interesting about that is my sites are starting to "wake up" where they've all been pretty dormant- I was at .12 total earnings (on Wizzley only) until a few days ago when clicks started to come in about the time I published my Regrow Teeth article... some trends tend to stay busy while others biorhythm like a bi-polar article! I had an article on HP that was ALWAYS spiking and barely ever dipping but here on Wizzley the dam thing is a dead paperweight, likely because it has no backlinks- which bring in more traffic by virtue of those sites sending you targeted traffic... I'm just waiting for someone to reddit it- that's what made it take off in the first place... It all works out overall if you take a yearly snapshot and average out earnings, traffic stats, and dead/spike zones- you will notice a middle point to count on.

Jerrico


Jerrico Usher - The Grass May Be Greener On The Other Side But I Installed A Mirror Over There! :-) - Join Our Wizzler Chat Room created by the people for the people to the people
TerriRexson
Posts: 175
Message
on 07/04/2012

 

Jerrico_Usher: 04. Jul 2012, 09:02

@Terri - My experience has been that there are biorhythms to the web, you'll have long periods of success then equally long or longer periods of latency (traffic, clicks etc...). It's generally due to a lot of factors like hollidays, trends coming and going or other trends hijacking the spotlight (and oops no wizzles etc... in those areas so you see a drop off) but as people tend to return to old trends things pick up... I noticed that summer seems to be a pretty quiet time overall because more people are out and about enjoying the sun while winter most people don't want to drive in snow or rain and are at home surfing... but some trends do better in the summer- go figure (like where to go during the summer).

I've gotten used to not worrying about it and find that you just have to plan for the dead zones with the busy times, especially income-wise. Many of the successful internet marketers I know have a system in place for this very thing. My boss, for example does millions of dollars of business on the web and says if you don't save for the dips you panic and since there's no telling when a dip will mature back to a spike, you really have to prepare for anything.

Also in the dips you can do some searches (by doing searches I'm talking of course about using Google trends database to see a live snapshot of booming trends) to see where the trends are going and build articles based on what you find, this is about balancing your portfolio and using slow times to figure out what's missing from your line up. I've also talked to a lot of the people I know during my own dips and about half of them always tend to be up when I'm down and down when I'm up- they are on different trends so it all makes sense. One thing you get used to when you work exclusively online is that there is no steady paycheck- we do, afterall, work on commission :) but if you budget for it you don't feel any different as your paying yourself the same. I've been watching your articles pretty carefully lately as you seem to be doing pretty good...

 

It's just articles ranking less well with google. Not trends, seasonal or anything like that. 

Luckily everything else is doing well for me at the moment so this isn't an issue for my business (I've just adapted my plan based on what's working.) 

And I have plenty of contingency built in. I can't imagine writing online and living paycheck to paycheck - that would be scary! 

 

 

 


Jerrico_Usher
Posts: 1210
Message
on 07/04/2012

ironically many new marketers who meet with some success do just that (try to live paycheck to paycheck as they did in the offline job market) and when the market dips they find themselves broke and motivation wanes until they eventually quit instead of learning from it. You seem to have your chit together pretty well Terri, you inspire me.

Jerrico


Jerrico Usher - The Grass May Be Greener On The Other Side But I Installed A Mirror Over There! :-) - Join Our Wizzler Chat Room created by the people for the people to the people
Natasha
Posts: 149
Message
on 07/04/2012

 

TerriRexson: 04. Jul 2012, 04:43

My Wizzley content seems to be decaying rather than maturing! I guess I just created all my early content in the honeymoon period. Initially my Wizzley content did well from day 1 (and stayed up.) 

My sentiments exactly.

Though traffic is on the rise from couple of days so I guess the honeymoon period may be back.(Fingers crossed)

onetimeuser
Posts: 378
Message
on 07/04/2012

 

TerriRexson: 04. Jul 2012, 11:12

 

Jerrico_Usher: 04. Jul 2012, 09:02

@Terri - My experience has been that there are biorhythms to the web, you'll have long periods of success then equally long or longer periods of latency (traffic, clicks etc...). It's generally due to a lot of factors like hollidays, trends coming and going or other trends hijacking the spotlight (and oops no wizzles etc... in those areas so you see a drop off) but as people tend to return to old trends things pick up... I noticed that summer seems to be a pretty quiet time overall because more people are out and about enjoying the sun while winter most people don't want to drive in snow or rain and are at home surfing... but some trends do better in the summer- go figure (like where to go during the summer).

I've gotten used to not worrying about it and find that you just have to plan for the dead zones with the busy times, especially income-wise. Many of the successful internet marketers I know have a system in place for this very thing. My boss, for example does millions of dollars of business on the web and says if you don't save for the dips you panic and since there's no telling when a dip will mature back to a spike, you really have to prepare for anything.

Also in the dips you can do some searches (by doing searches I'm talking of course about using Google trends database to see a live snapshot of booming trends) to see where the trends are going and build articles based on what you find, this is about balancing your portfolio and using slow times to figure out what's missing from your line up. I've also talked to a lot of the people I know during my own dips and about half of them always tend to be up when I'm down and down when I'm up- they are on different trends so it all makes sense. One thing you get used to when you work exclusively online is that there is no steady paycheck- we do, afterall, work on commission :) but if you budget for it you don't feel any different as your paying yourself the same. I've been watching your articles pretty carefully lately as you seem to be doing pretty good...

 

It's just articles ranking less well with google. Not trends, seasonal or anything like that. 

Luckily everything else is doing well for me at the moment so this isn't an issue for my business (I've just adapted my plan based on what's working.) 

And I have plenty of contingency built in. I can't imagine writing online and living paycheck to paycheck - that would be scary! 

 

 

 

 

I've made a living online for the past three years, there have been some scary moments no doubt.

I'm soon to be making plans to return to the job market. I'm taking accountancy qualifications.

I pretty much worked out that I can double my pay cheque by also working online, I'd be better off financially.

Primarily though, I miss the face to face interaction with humans.

Jerrico_Usher
Posts: 1210
Message
on 07/04/2012

I hear you there brother! I've worked exclusively online for over 5 years, before that I spent 2 years learning everything and failing to death (the only real way to build the skill set) until one day it clicked (and I started working also online for an internet based company- my backup paycheck), and it's been a great deal of freedom, but this last 2 years have really sucked in the face to face department. 90% of the people I interact with I've never seen in person some not even a picture, just yahoo... I have no clue what my boss even looks like!

It bores into your mental state ambition and health, but what I truly miss is, lol, working for a living in a real work place environment where you have a boss stressing you out, co-workers to talk to and marvel about the internet money concepts, and all around stimulation that isn't digitally based. 

I'm about to go out and do what most people only dream about- getting a job for the work and interactions not so much desperation to earn a living... Working online is great and lucrative but  I really miss the things I used to hate that lead me to work online in the first place- the routine of a job! One that makes you get up in the morning, go to bed at a normal hour, and actually miss the house! haha!


Jerrico Usher - The Grass May Be Greener On The Other Side But I Installed A Mirror Over There! :-) - Join Our Wizzler Chat Room created by the people for the people to the people
TerriRexson
Posts: 175
Message
on 07/05/2012

I have to decide whether to return to my professional job (I'm on a long sabbatical.) 

My job had human interaction every moment of the day. I don't really miss it. But I've got two small kids so I'm round at school a lot and will probably volunteer there once my youngest starts school in September. 

I could earn a lot more in my job. But I don't really need to now. We live cheaply. 

It's definitely worth putting the time in when you're young to get the mortgage paid off and build up a pension and savings. 

I guess I'm semi-retired at the moment! I'll probably work for less than 8 months this year and very part-time. 

I need to work out what to do next. I don't think I'll be going back to my job, or any other job though!


onetimeuser
Posts: 378
Message
on 07/05/2012

 

TerriRexson: 05. Jul 2012, 01:56

I have to decide whether to return to my professional job (I'm on a long sabbatical.) 

My job had human interaction every moment of the day. I don't really miss it. But I've got two small kids so I'm round at school a lot and will probably volunteer there once my youngest starts school in September. 

I could earn a lot more in my job. But I don't really need to now. We live cheaply. 

It's definitely worth putting the time in when you're young to get the mortgage paid off and build up a pension and savings. 

I guess I'm semi-retired at the moment! I'll probably work for less than 8 months this year and very part-time. 

I need to work out what to do next. I don't think I'll be going back to my job, or any other job though!

My intention is to get qualified, work full-time for a year (and dipping my toes in online, evenings and weekends perhaps).

Then use the year on my CV to find the same job part-time somewhere else. 

Two and a half days per week would be superb. I'd love to take the best of both worlds.

That enables me to participate in the things that I enjoyed about working for a firm, like Christmas parties.

I even enjoyed the pressure when it was light pressure (e.g. having to work hard on the Friday to meet my weekly target).

I walked out of my last job and took the plunge when the place started to develop a nasty environment, a blame culture and far too much pressure for too little pay.

But I know that not all workplaces are horrible places to work. 

20 hours a week working offline, 20-30 online for myself, that would be awesome.

onetimeuser
Posts: 378
Message
on 07/05/2012

 

Jerrico_Usher: 04. Jul 2012, 18:22

I hear you there brother! I've worked exclusively online for over 5 years, before that I spent 2 years learning everything and failing to death (the only real way to build the skill set) until one day it clicked (and I started working also online for an internet based company- my backup paycheck), and it's been a great deal of freedom, but this last 2 years have really sucked in the face to face department. 90% of the people I interact with I've never seen in person some not even a picture, just yahoo... I have no clue what my boss even looks like!

It bores into your mental state ambition and health, but what I truly miss is, lol, working for a living in a real work place environment where you have a boss stressing you out, co-workers to talk to and marvel about the internet money concepts, and all around stimulation that isn't digitally based. 

I'm about to go out and do what most people only dream about- getting a job for the work and interactions not so much desperation to earn a living... Working online is great and lucrative but  I really miss the things I used to hate that lead me to work online in the first place- the routine of a job! One that makes you get up in the morning, go to bed at a normal hour, and actually miss the house! haha!

Another option is volunteering.

I need to resume a hobby or two as well. Definite cabin fever, and lacking interaction.

Jerrico_Usher
Posts: 1210
Message
on 07/05/2012

I came to learn there are certain brain chemicals that don't fire correctly or consistently enough if you don't have stimulating interactions (in the real world i.e. reading body language, healthy debates etc...) and this is a syndrome many online workers run into, people can even die if they don't get it and it only comes from offline type activities (hobbies, interactions, exercise, etc...)... I wrote an article about this and the other things people neglect to do when working online called Are You A Work At Home Zombie? Here's The Cure. Another idea is a site I found called meetup.com where you can hook up with a bunch of people in your area to do just about anything from group hiking to anything a group of people would do. Me and Michelle are thinking about utilizing that but staying away from group laptop meetings at starbucks LOL...


Jerrico Usher - The Grass May Be Greener On The Other Side But I Installed A Mirror Over There! :-) - Join Our Wizzler Chat Room created by the people for the people to the people
Loading ...
Error!