The Third Retro Computer Museum Open Day, 15 November 2009

by WordChazer

The location: a village hall in Swannington, near Coalville, Leicestershire. The atmosphere: a cacophony of bleeps, whistles, pings and assorted other electronic music.

The Retro Computer Museum is a voluntary organisation dedicated to the preservation of early home computers, consoles and arcade games. They hold regular hands-on meetings in accommodating venues where visitors can play the old machines, lovingly restored and maintained by the small team at the heart of the organisation.

Restoration of Ataris, Amigas, Commodores and Arcade Game Consoles

A group of retro games fans were milling around inside the hall, which was filled to bursting point with a variety of Commodores, Amigas, Sinclair Spectrums, Ataris and Acorns. In one corner, the youngsters were playing driving games on Nintendo consoles and Sega Dreamcast consoles; on the stage, there was a knockout challenge underway involving a Japanese game called Bomberman projected onto a side wall. Arcade games hulked in the opposite corner from the Nintendos, nestled alongside a small machine running an early version of Galaxians.

My Arcade Retro Machine Handheld Gaming System with 200 Built-in Video Games

View on Amazon

Lifetime 90056 Basketball Double Shot Arcade System

This new and improved indoor Lifetime Double Shot arcade basketball game turns your recreational room into an arcade with optical scoring sensors, an adjustable-height backboard...

View on Amazon

Professionally made commercial cocktail arcade, 60 classic games

View on Amazon

Working BBC Micros on Show

Working in conjunction with a small group of like-minded BBC Micro enthusiasts, the RCM team had managed to fill all three rooms of the hall with technology: in one side room were more arcade games and in the other a range of BBC Micros displaying various tweaks and modifications – one had a music sound card which caused the music to display as coloured bars on the screen, another was set to show Biorhythms and one was blank so that those who wished could recall their BASIC programming and make the machine do what they would.

Classic Early PC Games Appeal to All Ages

Games on show included Manic Miner, Jet Set Willy, various incarnations of space invaders (including Zap, Kristal Konnection and Galaxians – in its original pre-upgrade version) Wolfenstein, Lemmings, Drop Zone, Pac-Man and Doom. There was a sprinkling of driving games, a slew of shoot-‘em-ups and a variety of maze games.

The visitors were mainly 30-something males, although there were a few girls around as well as the children of gaming couples. Mid-afternoon a delegation of students arrived from Leicester de Montfort University and the noise and crowding levels hit uncomfortable volumes for a while whilst everyone adjusted to suddenly having 30 extra people in the room all at once.

Unlimited Gaming Combined with Healthy Home-Cooked Food

The joy of hiring a village hall is that all the facilities are in place to provide healthy home-cooked food to numbers of people and a small team of ladies had colonised the kitchen, turning out jacket potatoes with a variety of fillings, wheat-free muffins, and industrial levels of tea, coffee and squash to order. There was also a good supply of canned drinks, crisps and chocolate for those who needed an extra boost.

Manic Miner (Software Projects, 1990) - Amiga

Time left: 4 weeks, 1 day
Fixed price: $18.75  Buy It Now

Manic Miner 100% Official Spectrum 48k Commodore 64 Retro Game...

Time left: 1 week, 3 days
Fixed price: $12.18  Buy It Now

Manic Miner Commodore 64 Video Game T Shirt

Time left: 2 weeks, 6 days
Fixed price: $19.99  Buy It Now

Fundraising Efforts

There was a small charge to enter, as well as a raffle to raise further funds towards the group’s stated aim of opening a retro computer and console museum and wheat-free tearoom somewhere in Leicestershire. There is a small range of merchandise available (T-shirts, mugs, pens) through the website and at most of these gatherings a bring-and-buy style stall where items for donation can be left and computer-related items sold in aid of the cause.

A fun day out, full of simple pleasures and friendly people. Recommended retro entertainment for those who remember it first time around and for enthusiasts to show their children. If something as big and involved as the Vintage Computer Festival would feel like too much, this would make an ideal starting place to revisit the early days of computer games.

This article originally appeared on on 25 June 2010. It was removed at the writer's request in February 2013, and appears here with slight revision and additional photographs.

Updated: 12/25/2013, WordChazer
Thank you! Would you like to post a comment now?


WordChazer on 05/11/2013

You've come to the right place then ;-)

AnomalousArtist on 05/11/2013

As old as I get and as intense as new games become I never get tired of the simple joys of the "early" games! :)

WordChazer on 03/11/2013

Awww. Come to an RCM event and there may be one for sale...

EliasZanetti on 03/11/2013

As much as I live I will never forget my Atari! Grew up with it, i do miss it sometimes :)

You might also like

The Centre for Computing History, Cambridge, England

A dedicated band of individuals maintain, demonstrate and exhibit old computi...

Silicon Dreams, Snibston Discovery Museum, 5-7 July 2013

No, not a dodgy website or a teenage fantasy but a vibrant new festival celeb...

Disclosure: This page generates income for authors based on affiliate relationships with our partners, including Amazon, Google and others.
Loading ...