Fall Smoothie with Butternut Squash and Plums

by Mira

If you thought smoothies come only cold, think again! Warm smoothies are a nice treat in the fall and winter, and this combination is perfect warm. 15-minute recipe.

With the fall season upon us, I embraced the opportunity to cook with butternut squash and plums. Or wanted to, at least. Did get to use half a butternut squash, but didn’t get to make my plum dumplings. Yesterday I whipped up a cold smoothie with raspberries and plums, as I had some raspberries in my freezer and needed a boost of energy. Today I looked at my plums again, and at half a butternut squash sitting in the fridge, considered the tang and sweetness of the plums and the sweetness, mellow and nutty flavor and silky smoothness of the butternut squash . . . and saw them coming together in a great smoothie, made perfect with a rather large pinch of nutmeg. Ah, and did I mention butternut squash and plums have great health benefits?

Use Any Kind of Plums You Like

I used Damson plums, which are the common cultivar in Romania. And we do plums a lot. You may have heard of our famous plum brandy, țuica. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization, in 2010, Romania was the second largest producer of plums and sloes (don't know why they were grouped together) in the world, after China. There was a great gap between these first two spots, however, as expected. Then, going down to the next countries, the gap narrowed considerably.

Ingredients and Instructions

Ingredients and Instructions

Prep time 10 min  -  Total time 15 min
Ingredients for 4 servings
600 grams (21 oz) butternut squash  • 500 grams (18 oz) Damson plums  • 2 tablespoons honey  • ½ flat teaspoon nutmeg

1. Bring some water to a boil.
2. Peel the butternut squash and dice it.
3. Boil the squash for 10 minutes only.
4. Break the plums in half and remove the pit.
5. Add the plums and butternut squash to a blender. When you ladle in the squash, keep some of the hot water. It blends better and you need that liquid in the final smoothie.
6. Add 2 tablespoons of honey and ½ flat teaspoon of nutmeg.
7. Purée and serve right away, warm.

Recipe  0.0/5 Stars (0 Votes)

Step-by-Step Pictures for this Warm Smoothie Recipe

Peel and Dice the Butternut Squash
Peel and Dice the Butternut Squash
© Mira at Wizzley
Halve Plums and Remove Pits
Halve Plums and Remove Pits
© Mira at Wizzley
Blend Squash, Plums, Honey, and Nutmeg
Blend Squash, Plums, Honey, and Nutmeg
© Mira at Wizzley
Serve This Smoothie Warm
Serve This Smoothie Warm
© Mira at Wizzley

Health Benefits of Plums

Everyone who suffers from constipation or has someone close who does is probably familiar with the fact that plums are a good remedy. They contain not only fiber, but also two compounds, sorbitol and isatin, that are natural laxatives.

A cup of plums also contains 26% DV vitamin C, 13 % vitamin K, 11% DV vitamin A, and lower amounts of B-complex vitamins. I wrote about the health benefits of vitamin C and vitamin A here.

Plums also contain potassium (7%), copper (5%), manganese (4%), phosphorus (3%), magnesium (3%), iron (2%), and calcium (1%).

My source at nutritiondata.self.com doesn’t specify the cultivar; numbers will be different from cultivar to cultivar and region to region.

Health Benefits of Butternut Squash

Butternut squash is rich in beta-carotene (the most important provitamin A carotenoid), and also contains lutein, B-complex vitamins, vitamin C, and several minerals: manganese, potassium, iron, calcium, magnesium, copper, phosphorus, zinc, and selenium.

What does that mean? It means that by eating squash you get a load of antioxidants which protect you against the harmful effects of free radicals. Vitamin A also protects your vision, as do the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin, present in leafy green vegetables and also, to a much lesser extent, in other green, orange and yellow fruits and vegetables . . . and the retina of the eye (in the macular area).

Lutein and zeaxanthin are not synthesized by our bodies, which is why we have to make sure we get them through our diet. These two antioxidant carotenoids protect not only against cataracts and age-related macular degeneration, but also against heart disease, strokes, and breast and lung cancer. See here on PubMed.gov the abstract of an article published in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition in 2004, titled “Lutein and zeaxanthin and their potential roles in disease prevention.”

The foods richest in lutein and zeaxanthin are cooked spinach, cooked kale, cooked turnip greens and cooked collards (cooking releases lutein). Then, with amounts several times smaller than the afore-mentioned leafy greens, come other vegetables and fruits, such as broccoli, corn, lettuce, peas, Brussel sprouts, beans, tangerines, oranges, papayas, melons, and carrots.

Some of My Other Healthy, Easy Recipes

This low-fat creamy soup is a healthy and easy recipe which you can make quickly with fresh or frozen ingredients. It's very tasty! A great way to enjoy broccoli.
Say you think you can’t cook, but you want to make something special. Here’s a very tasty recipe for cooking newbies. Easy to make mistake-free. Pictures included.
It’s late afternoon, and you’re expecting a couple of friends over for a few minutes before you all head out to have dinner together. What can you serve them?
Updated: 10/11/2014, Mira
Thank you! Would you like to post a comment now?


Mira on 06/07/2015

My mother makes creamed spinach with milk and lots of garlic. It's good but I prefer spinach in salads myself. But she makes hers as a side to veal, which works well.
In terms of foods in season, we now have apricots, which are delicious. Also peaches. I think they're imported though. I've seen them in supermarkets only. But cherries and tart cherries are ripe here now.

DerdriuMarriner on 06/04/2015

Mira, The weather is a bit unseasonably cool for this week. It got me thinking of drinks and foods from later in the year's seasons. So it's fun to read this article about fruits and vegetables around the corner in terms of harvests and recipes.
Do you have any favorite recipes with spinach?

Mira on 05/28/2014

Yes, I like them both, too, and there are ways to take advantage of their different qualities.

Guest on 05/27/2014

Mira, Zucchinis are available in India, just not everywhere there, so in some areas it would be rare or unavailable.
I think that zucchini is a plant that produces so many zucchinis that I'm surprised in a way that it is rare elsewhere.
In fact, some gardeners here in the U.S. complain about having a surfeit of zucchinis and about not knowing what to do with them. That's why I've shared a number of zucchini recipes, because I never worry about what to do with them. :-0
Summer squash always substitutes well for zucchini. I detect interesting, nuanced differences in taste and texture but I like both zucchini and summer squash.

Mira on 05/27/2014

No zucchinis in India! How interesting. In fact, zucchinis are rare here, too. We use another kind of summer squash over here. It's cheaper, a third of the cost of a zucchini.

Guest on 05/27/2014

Mira, You could also consider substitutions for ingredients which are expensive or unavailable. For example, WriterArtist was interested in one of my zucchini recipes and indicated that she didn't know if she could locate zucchinis in India. So I suggested eggplant, which I often do substitute for zucchini.

Mira on 05/27/2014

Kevin Lynch on Closet Cooking has an ebook out with "tasty soups." They're not off the charts but they're very good. He's doing a heck of a good job!
I will also look on another big site that culls tiles from all over the Web. I forget that site's name right now but it's a great resource and I may find some more unusual recipes. Of course, the problem with that is, I may not be able to find all the ingredients! (And if I do, they may be very expensive. But I like a good challenge :-)

Guest on 05/27/2014

Mira, Do it! :-)

Mira on 05/27/2014

Oh, how I love the seasons! :-) Your comment reminded me of that. :) It also reminded me of some cold soups, some of them sweet, one of which I have mentioned before. I think I'll look into this some more. Soups are a fascinating topic. (As are smoothies.)

Guest on 05/27/2014

Mira, As a soup lover, I cherish both hot and cold soups. I love that soups can be a year-round phenomenon.
I revisited this recipe because I love the idea of combining butternut squash with plums. It's been a cool spring -- which has often seemed autumn-like in the look of the sky, the shedding of some leaves from exuberant winds, and the coolness of the air -- so I've been thinking of autumn's cuisine, which may possibly be my favorite.

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