Abyssinian Genets (Genetta abyssinica): Ringtails in Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Somalia, and Sudan

by DerdriuMarriner

Some names convey ancientness. For example, Abyssinia anciently includes modern Eritrea’s and Ethiopia’s highlands. It is home to Abyssinian genets, Pharaonic Egypt’s beloved pets.

Whatever and whoever carries the names Abyssinia and Abyssinian claims ancient legacies.
• The adjective and the noun conjure up bygone events and long-ago times, not vanished places or vanquished beings.

Abyssinia in fact designates specific bio-geographies.
• It exists as an ancient identification for the Eritrean and Ethiopian highlands in the Horn of northeast Africa.
• Archaeologically, it guards artifacts from powerful societies such as that of the Queen of Sheba, wise King Solomon’s contemporary in Old Testament times.
• Culturally, it hallows the homeland of two languages -- Amharic and Tigrinya -- linked with Africa’s longstanding Christian populations.
• Ecologically, it offers the environmental conditions, prevailing vegetation, and surface geology facilitating the survival and the sustainability of rare Abyssinian genets.

Detail of panel of King Solomon welcoming Queen of Sheba

Ethiopian Chapel in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre
Ethiopian Chapel in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre

 

Genet fossils date back 2,558,000 -- 5,332,000 years in Africa. They define a tree-loving omnivore whose evolution from the proposed ancestor of all carnivores -- the civet- and marten-like, lithe-bodied, long-tailed miacids of 33,000,000 -- 62,000,000 years ago -- may be clear, direct, and faithful. They describe a ground-foraging mammal whose elongated skull, flexible skeleton with digitigrade (“on the digits,” tiptoes”) phalanges (“digits”) and extended tail, and goodly dentition (“arrangement, kind, and number of teeth”) remain evident, recognizable, and unchanged among today’s genets in general and in Abyssinia’s genets in particular. They function as especially helpful guideposts since budget-strapped researchers lack ample access to:

  • Documented specimens (of which fewer than 20 exist in museums worldwide);
  • Historical records;
  • Local anecdotes.

 

 

Scientists consider Abyssinian and other non-aquatic genets members of the taxonomic genus Genetta, a scientific name which originates in the French version, genette, of the original Arabic designation, jarnait. Inaccessible bio-geography of genet populations and limited funding for genet research do not allow clear, comprehensive understanding by twenty-first century scientists of the nocturnal arborealist’s life cycle and natural history. Abyssinian genets consequently find themselves in a genus whose number of valid species contracts and expands with the particular scientist’s individualized experiences and hypotheses. But they find themselves not at all alone in claiming as home Abyssinia’s modern geo-political configurations. Common European small-spotted (Genetta genetta) and rusty-spotted panther (Genetta maculata) genets also include Africa’s Horn within their homelands.

 

Common European small-spotted genets (Genetta genetta) overlap with Abyssinian Genets in Ethiopian Highlands.

parc animalier des Pyrénées, Argelès-Gazost, Hautes-Pyrénées, France
parc animalier des Pyrénées, Argelès-Gazost, Hautes-Pyrénées, France

 

The official focusing of European scientific attention on Abyssinian genets, Genetta abyssinica, dates to 1836. It draws upon Wilhelm Peter Eduard Simon Rüppell’s (November 20, 1794 – December 10, 1884) expertise as:

  • Frankfurt-on-Main-born German naturalist;
  • Genoa-, Naples- and Pavia-trained botanist, ichthyologist, and zoologist in Italy;
  • Gulf of Aqaba and Sinai Peninsula explorer, 1821 - 1822;
  • Nile River-area specimen collector, from Cairo, Egypt to south of Ambukol, Sudan, 1823 – 1825;
  • Northeast Africa pioneer throughout Ethiopia, 1826 and 1830 - 1833.

Eduard’s descriptions and drawings regarding Abyssinia and Abyssinian genets find themselves preserved in his publications:

  • Neue Wirbelthiere zu der Fauna von Abyssinien gehörig, (“New Vertebrates of the Abyssinian Fauna”), 1835 – 1840;
  • Reise in Abyssinien (“Travels in Abyssinia”), 1838 – 1840.

 

1846 portrait of Eduard Rüppell
1846 portrait of Eduard Rüppell

 

Eduard’s genets cannot be mistaken for fellow Horn of Africa-residing genets if witnesses know the Abyssinian genet’s ancient-like looks and traditional niches. Abyssinian genets encourage sand-colored corporeal interpretations whereas African rusty-spotted and Eurasian small-spotted genets respectively project greyness and rustiness. The Abyssinian genet’s coarse-, short-, thick-haired, yellow-brown coat nevertheless imparts other colors and tones with:

  • Alert, light ears;
  • Dark, rounded eyes;
  • Dark spinal stripe lightly over-lined from shoulders to tail base;
  • Fine sensory whiskers;
  • 5 black-spotted rows forming irregular, unbroken lines at the top of each flank;
  • Light cheeks, eye-rings, and neck;
  • Light limbs, paws (with hairless sole pads), and undersides;
  • 7 – 8 light tail rings alternating with darker, thicker bands right to the predictably black tip.

 

illustration by German naturalist and explorer Wilhelm Peter Eduard Simon Rüppell (November 20, 1794 - December 10, 1884)
Viverra abyssinia (Rüppell)
Viverra abyssinia (Rüppell)

 

Newborn Abyssinian genets emerge as blind, deaf, petite versions of day-sleeping, fleet-moving, graceful-gaited, lean-bodied, lighter-colored, long-necked, night-tripping, short-legged adults. They exhibit physical and sexual maturity with:

  • Dental formulas: 12 incisors, 4 canines, 16 premolars, and 8 molars equally divided within the pointed muzzle’s upper and lower jaws;
  • Head-and-body lengths: 15.75 – 19.69 inches (400 – 500 millimeters);
  • Tail lengths: 15.75 – 17.72 inches (400 – 450 millimeters);
  • Weights: 2.87 – 4.41 pounds (1.3 – 2 kilograms).

They have unknown life expectancies whose attainment involves:

  • Building dens in and near trees;
  • Conducting paired or solitary forages;
  • Eluding predatory mammals, raptors, and reptiles.

They may be considered omnivorous carnivores because of opportunistic feeding upon:

  • Flowers, foliage, fruits, nuts, seeds;
  • Frogs;
  • Insects;
  • Lizards;
  • Small mammals;
  • Snakes.

 

Native to maquis shrublands surrounding Mediterranean Basin, Erica arborea occurs as disjunct population in Ethiopian Highlands:

In 2002, Abyssinian genets were observed in montane dry forest habitats featuring Erica arborea.
Erica arborea. Botanical specimen on the grounds of the Villa Taranto (Verbania), Lake Maggiore, Italy.
Erica arborea. Botanical specimen on the grounds of the Villa Taranto (Verbania), Lake Maggiore, Italy.

 

The successful pursuit of omnivorous diets can be considered a convincing example of the carnivorous Abyssinian genet’s adaptable intelligence. Eduard’s Abyssinian genets display additionally persuasive environmental adaptability by accepting a range of habitats within:

  • Djibouti;
  • Eritrea;
  • Ethiopia (central and southern areas);
  • Somalia (northwestern portion);
  • Sudan (central, eastern, and southern regions).

They indeed do not disdain niches within such bio-geographical extremes as:

  • Afro-alpine grasslands up to elevations of 12,303 feet (3,750 meters) above sea level;
  • Coastal plains;
  • Dry mountain forests;
  • Dry open lowlands;
  • Heather-dominated mountain moorlands.

But regarding den-building, food-seeking, and offspring-raising, they favor wildlife associations involving:

  • Abyssinian roses (Rosa abyssinica);
  • Acacia, African redwood (Hagenia abyssinica), African juniper (Juniperus procera);
  • Curry bushes (Hypericum revolutum);
  • Tree heath (Erica arborea).  

 

closeup of flowers and foliage of Curry Bush (Hypericum revolutum):

Abyssinian genet's floral synecology
Spring flowers of a Curry Bush, Jan Celliers Park, Pretoria
Spring flowers of a Curry Bush, Jan Celliers Park, Pretoria

Conclusion: Pharaonic Egypt's favorite pets amidst modern challenges

 

Experts and non-specialists alike cannot count upon catching sight of reclusive Abyssinian genets. Specialists expect that camera-trapping and radio-telemetry may facilitate research opportunities. But they also keep in mind that attempts to elucidate remote life cycles and natural histories find frustration in the Abyssinian genet’s:

  • Camouflaged body;
  • 5 strong claws per paw;
  • Quick escapes;
  • Sharp teeth capable of cat-like, lethal, nape-of-the-neck, painless, quick bites;
  • Smelly scent gland-launched emissions;
  • Soundless movements;
  • Super-sensitive ears, eyes, nose, and whiskers.

They know that Pharaonic Egypt’s favorite pets -- before being nudged gently aside by odorless cats -- need to have their life stories told what with twenty-first century challenges from:

  • Globally-warmed climate change;
  • Habitat-fragmenting, land-clearing, livestock-raising agro-industrialists;
  • Meat- and pelt-hunting locals.

 

Abyssinian rose (Rosa abyssinica) is one of Africa's few indigenous roses: illustration by John Lindley (February 5, 1799 – November 1, 1865) ~

In 2002 Abyssinian genets were observed in montane dry forest habitats in which dominant floral species included Rosa abyssinia.
John Lindley, Rosarum Monographia (1820), Tab. 13, opp. p. 116
John Lindley, Rosarum Monographia (1820), Tab. 13, opp. p. 116

Acknowledgment

 

My special thanks to:

  • Talented artists and photographers/concerned organizations who make their fine images available on the Internet;
  • Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University for superior on-campus and on-line resources.

 

Wide-ranging Panther Genet (Genetta maculata) overlaps with Abyssinian Genet in Ethiopian Highlands.

Shimba Hills National Reserve, southeastern Kenya
Shimba Hills National Reserve, southeastern Kenya

Sources Consulted

 

"Abyssinian Genet." The Animal Files: Mammals > Carnivores. Retrieved May 1, 2014.

  • Available at: http://www.theanimalfiles.com/mammals/carnivores/genet_abyssinian.html

"Abyssinian Genet Pictures and Facts." The Website of Everything: Animals > Mammals > Carnivora > Viverridae > Viverrinae > Genetta. Retrieved May 1, 2014.

  • Available at: http://thewebsiteofeverything.com/animals/mammals/Carnivora/Viverridae/Genetta/Genetta-abyssinica.html

Balakrishnan, Mundanthra; and Afework, Bekele. October 2008. “A Road Kill of the Ethiopian Genet Genetta abyssinica along the Addis Ababa-Dira Dewa Highway, Ethiopia.” Small Carnivore Conservation 39:37-38. Retrieved May 1, 2014.

  • Available at: http://www.smallcarnivoreconservation.org/sccwiki/images/2/2a/SCC39_Balakrishnan_and_Afework.pdf

Bisby, F.A.; Roskov, Y.R.; Orrell, T.M.; Nicolson, D.; Paglinawan, L.E.; Bailly, N.; Kirk, P.M.; Bourgoin, T.; Baillargeon, G.; and Ouvrard, D. (red.). 2011. "Genetta abyssinica." Species 2000 & ITIS Catalogue of Life: 2011 Annual Checklist. Reading, UK. Retrieved May 1, 2014.

  • Available at:

    http://www.catalogueoflife.org/col/search/scientific/genus/genetta/species/abyssinica/match/1

Boelens, Bo; Watkins, Michael; and Grayson, Michael. 2009. The Eponym Dictionary of Mammals. JHU Press.

Boudet, Ch. 10 January 2009. "Species Sheet: Abyssinian Genet." Mammals' Planet: Vs n°4, 04/2010. Retrieved May 1, 2014.

  • Available at: http://www.planet-mammiferes.org/drupal/en/node/38?indice=Genetta+abyssinica

Corson, Docteur P.-J. October 2005. Les grands prédateurs d’Afrique: biologie, éthnologie et chasse. Brussels, Belgium: Éditions du Gerfaut.

Crawford-Cabral, J. 1981. “A New Classification of the Genets.” African Small Mammal Newsletter6:8-10.  

Crawford-Cabral, João. 1980. "The Classification of the Genets (Carnivora, Viverridae, genus Genetta)." Boletim da Sociedade Portuguesa de Ciências Naturais 20:97-114.

Díaz Behrens, G.; and Van Rompaey, H. 2002. “The Ethiopian Genet, Genetta abyssinica (Rüppell 1836) (Carnivore, Viverridae): Ecology and Phenotypic Aspects." Small Carnivore Conservation 27:23-28.

Driver, Stephanie (ed.). 2008. Exploring Mammals. Tarrytown, NY: Marshall Cavendish Corporation.

Duff, Andrew; and Lawson, Ann. 2004. Mammals of the World: A Checklist. Yale University Press. 

Ewer, R.F. 1998. The Carnivores. Cornell University Press: Cornell Paperbacks.

Gaubert, Philippe; Balakrishnan, Mundanthra; and Bekele, Afework. April 2009. Corrigendum “A Road Kill of the Ethiopian Genet Genetta abyssinica along the Addis Ababa-Dira Dewa Highway, Ethiopia” by Mundanthra Balakrishnan and Afework Bekele (2008, Small Carnivore Conservation 39:37-38).” Small Carnivore Conservation 40:40. Retrieved May 1, 2014.

  • Available at: http://www.smallcarnivoreconservation.org/sccwiki/images/a/af/SCC40_Gaubert_et_al_SCC.pdf

Gaubert, Philippe; and Dufour, Sylvain. July 2013. “First Report of a Chinchilla Phenotype in Viverridae (Carnivora).” Small Carnivore Conservation 48:92-95. Retrieved May 1, 2014.

  • Available at: http://www.smallcarnivoreconservation.org/home/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/SCC-48-11-Gaubert-Dufour.pdf

Gaubert, P.; Chalubert, A.; and Dubus, G. 2008. “An Interactive Identification Key for Genets and Oyans (Carnivora, Viverridae, Genettinae, Genetta spp. and Poiana spp.) Using Xper2.” Zootaxa 1717:39-50.

Gaubert, P.; and Hoffmann, M. 2008. "Genetta abyssinica." In: IUCN 2013. International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. Retrieved May 1, 2014.

  • Available at: http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/8994/0

Gaubert, P.; Fernandes, C. A.; Bruford, M. W.; and Veron, G. 2004. "Genets (Carnivora, Viverridae) in Africa: An Evolutionary Synthesis Based on Cytochrome b Sequences and Morphological Characters." Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 81:589-610.

Gaubert, P.; Papeş, M.; Peterson, A.T. June 2006. "Natural History Collections and the Conservation of Poorly Known Taxa: Ecological Niche Modeling in Central African Rainforest Genets (Genetta spp.)." Biological Conservation 130(1):106–117.

Gaubert, P.; Taylor, P.J.; and Veron, G. 2005. “Integrative Taxonomy and Phylogenetic Systematics of the Genets (Carnivora, Viverridae, Genetta): A New Classification of the Most Speciose Carnivoran Genus in Africa.” Pp. 371-384 in African Biodiversity: Molecules, Organisms, Ecosystems edited by Bernard A. Huber, Braldey J. Sinclair, and Karl-Heinz Lampe. NY: Springer Science + Business Media, Inc.

Gaubert, Philippe; Weltz, Marjorie; and Chalubert, Antoine. 14 January 2008. “Genetta abyssinica." Genets and Oyans. Paris: Université Pierre et Marie Curie. Retrieved May 1, 2014. 

  • Available at: http://lis-upmc.snv.jussieu.fr/genettes/web/fiches_en/taxa/genetta_abyssinica.html

"Genet." AWF: What We Do>Wildlife Conservation>Genet. African Wildlife Foundation. Retrieved May 1, 2014.

  • Available at: http://www.awf.org/wildlife-conservation/genet

Genetta abissina.” La Casa delle Farfalle di Bordano: Animals. Bordano, Udine, Italy. Retrieved May 1, 2014.

  • Available at: http://www.farfalledibordano.it/en/animal/abyssinian-genet

"Genetta abyssinica." The Marine Biological Laboratory Universal Biological Indexer and Organizer NamebankID 2478467. Retrieved May 1, 2014.

  • Available at: http://www.ubio.org/browser/details.php?namebankID=2478467

"Genetta abyssinica: Abyssinian Genet." Encyclopedia of Life. Retrieved May 1, 2014.

  • Available at: http://eol.org/pages/328093/details

"Genetta abyssinica (Ethiopian Genet)." ZipcodeZoo: Species Identifier 5388. Retrieved May 1, 2014.

  • Available at: http://zipcodezoo.com/animals/g/genetta_abyssinica/

Gervais, Paul. 1855. Histoire naturelle des Mammifères: Carnivores, Proboscidiens, Jumentés, Bisulques, Édentés, Marsupiaux, Monotrèmes, Phoques, Sirénides et Cétacés. Paris: L. Curmer.

Gittleman, John L.; Funk, Stephan M.; Macdonald, David; and Wayne, Robert K. (eds.). 2001. Carnivore Conservation. Cambridge University Press: Conservation Biology 5.

Gray, John Edward. 1869. Catalogue of Carnivorous, Pachydermatous, and Edentate Mammalia in the British Museum. London: Trustees of the British Museum (Natural History).

  • Available via Internet Archive at: https://archive.org/details/catalogueofcarni00brit

Huber, B.A.; Sinclair, B.J.; and Lampe, K.-H. (eds.). 2005. African Biodiversity: Molecules, Organisms, Ecosystems. NY: Springer.

Hunter, Luke; and Barrett, Priscilla. 2011. A Field Guide to the Carnivores of the World. London, Cape Town, Sydney, Auckland: New Holland Publishers (UK) Ltd.

Jennings, A. P.; and Veron, J. 2009. "Family Viverridae (Civets, Genets, and Oyans)." In: Don E. Wilson and Russel Mittermeier (Hrsg.) Handbook of the Mammals of the World Volume 1: Carnivores. Lynx Edicions.

Jukofsky, Diane for the Rainforest Alliance. 2002. Encyclopedia of Rainforests. Westport, CT: Oryx Press.

Kingdon, Jonathon; Happold, David; Butynski, Thomas; Hoffmann, Michael; Happold, Meredith; and Jan Kalina (eds.). 2013. Mammals of Africa, Volume 5: Carnivores, Pangolins, Equids and Rhinoceroses, edited by Jonathan Kingdon and Michael Hoffmann. Bloomsbury Publishing.

Kondo, H.; Tesar, J.; Cloud, D.; Kagan, L. (eds.). 1972. Civets, Genets, and Linsangs, Vol. 2, 3rd Edition. Milan: Fratelli Fabbri Editori.

Larivière, Serge. 2004. "Civets, Genets, and Linsangs." Pp. 335-339 in Grzimek's Animal Life Encyclopedia, Second Edition. Volume 14: Mammals III, edited by Michael Hutchins, Devra G. Kleiman, Valerius Geist, and Melissa C. McDade. Farmington Hills, MI: Gale Group, Inc., division of Thomson Learning Inc.

Mangin, Chris. 2014. "Ethiopian Montane Grasslands and Woodlands." World Wildlife Fund. Retrieved May 1, 2014.

  • Available at: http://worldwildlife.org/ecoregions/at1007

Myers, P.; Espinosa, R.; Parr, C.S.; Jones, T.; Hammond, G.S.; and Dewey, T.A. 2014. “Genetta abyssinica: Abyssinian Genet.” The Animal Diversity Web (On-line). University of Michigan Museum of Zoology. Retrieved May 1, 2014.

  • Available at: http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/accounts/Genetta_abyssinica/classification/

Gervais, Paul. 1855. Histoire naturelle des Mammifères: Carnivores, Proboscidiens, Jumentés, Bisulques, Édentés, Marsupiaux, Monotrèmes, Phoques, Sirénides et Cétacés. Paris: L. Curmer.

Gittleman, John L.; Funk, Stephan M.; Macdonald, David; and Wayne, Robert K. (eds.). 2001. Carnivore Conservation. Cambridge University Press: Conservation Biology 5.

Gray, John Edward. 1869. Catalogue of Carnivorous, Pachydermatous, and Edentate Mammalia in the British Museum. London: Trustees of the British Museum (Natural History).

  • Available via Internet Archive at: https://archive.org/details/catalogueofcarni00brit

Huber, B.A.; Sinclair, B.J.; and Lampe, K.-H. (eds.). 2005. African Biodiversity: Molecules, Organisms, Ecosystems. NY: Springer.

Lindley, John. 1820. Rosarum monographia; Or, A Botanical History of Roses. To Which Is Added An Appendix, For The Use Of Cultivators, In Which The Most Remarkable Garden Varieties Are Systematically Arranged. London: Printed for J. Ridgeway.

  • Available via Biodiversity Heritage Library at: http://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/10900856

Nowak, Ronald M. 1999. Walker's Mammals of the World, Sixth Edition. Volume I. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. 

Rosevear, Donovan Reginald. 1974. The Carnivores of West Africa. London: Trustees of the British Museum (Natural History).

  • Available via Biodiversity Heritage Library at: http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/35416#page/7/mode/1up

Rüppell, Eduard. 1835 - 1840. Neue Wirbelthiere zu der Fauna von Abyssinien gehörig. Frankfurt am Main: S. Schmerber.

  • Available via Biodiversity Heritage Library at: http://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/37140075

Veron, Geraldine. 6 September 2010. "Phylogeny of the Viverridae and 'Viverrid-like' feliforms." Pp. 64-91 in Carnivoran Evolution: New Views on Phylogeny, Form and Function, edited by Anjali Goswami and Anthony Friscia. Cambridge University Press.

Virgós, E.; Llorente, M.; and Cortés, Y. 1999. "Geographical Variation in Genet (Genetta genetta L.) Diet: A Literature Review." Mammalian Review 29:119-128.

Wilson, Don E.; and Cole, F. Russell. 2000. Common Names of Mammals of the World. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press.

Wilson, Don E.; and Reeder, DeeAnn M. (editors). 2005. Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed), Johns Hopkins University Press.

Wrobel, Murray (Editor). 2007. Elsevier's Dictionary of Mammals: Latin English German French Italian. Oxford, U.K.: Elsevier B.V.

 

In 2002 Abyssinian genets were observed at up to altitudes of 12,303 feet (3,750 meters) on the Abune Yosef massif, central Ethiopian Highlands:

Mount Abuna Yosef, with an elevation of 13,976 feet (4,260 meters), ranks as Ethiopia's 6th tallest mountain and as Africa's 19th highest.
"The Abuna Yosef Peak in the Simien Mountains of Ethiopia."
"The Abuna Yosef Peak in the Simien Mountains of Ethiopia."
the end which is also the beginning
the end which is also the beginning

Abyssinian by Dean Russo:

Unlike Abyssinian genets, Abyssinian cats may not have originated in Abyssinia (present-day Eritrea + northern half of Ethiopia).
Abyssinian

Queen of Sheba's Palace (Dungur), Axum, northern Ethiopia

Kings of Abyssinia traced their descent from Menelik, son of Queen of Sheba and King Solomon.
Photo Jigsaw Puzzle

Me and my purrfectly purrfect Maine coon kittycat, Augusta "Gusty" Sunshine

Gusty and I thank you for reading this article and hope that our product selection interests you; Gusty Gus receives favorite treats from my commissions.
DerdriuMarriner, All Rights Reserved
DerdriuMarriner, All Rights Reserved
Updated: 08/20/2014, DerdriuMarriner
 
Thank you! Would you like to post a comment now?
4

Comments


   Login
DerdriuMarriner on 05/06/2014

Mira, Your appreciation of nature is greatly appreciated. Your appreciation is revealed through your perceptive, encouraging comments. Thank you.

Mira on 05/05/2014

I see now. Yes, as I said, I did notice there wasn't much shown/known about them. Now I understand why. Thank you for your answer.

DerdriuMarriner on 05/05/2014

Mira, Genets and ringtails number among my longstanding special interests. Not much is available on them for the general public whereas information may be gleaned from the scientific domain. Genets and ringtails are elusive mammals, and many are found in protected areas where filmmaking is not easily accomplished. I'm just sharing here my longstanding interests, to familiarize readers with lesser known aspects of nature, to remind them of more familiar faunal and floral participants in nature.

Mira on 05/04/2014

I never see genets or similar animals on TV, and am intrigued to find genets and ringtails on your pages. Did you research them all as a group at one point, or are you researching them now, as you write about them?

You might also like

Common European Small-Spotted Genets (Genetta genetta): Linnae...

Spots and stripes act as camouflage. They also advise of scented communicatio...

African Linsangs (Poiana richardsonii): Ringtails of Central-W...

Spots and stripes face a controversial fashion history. Some fashionistas lik...


Disclosure: This page generates income for authors based on affiliate relationships with our partners, including Amazon, Google and others.
Loading ...
Error!