Blotched Large-Spotted Cape Genets (Genetta tigrina): Ringtails in Southernmost South Africa

by DerdriuMarriner

Blotched large-spotted Cape genets call South Africa’s Cape provinces home. Big spots form broken blotches on their flanks. Dark wide and thin pale rings stripe their tails.

Scientists currently accept 14 – 17 living genet species.
• One species appears to be native or naturalized to Eurasia and North Africa.
• All other genet species belong among the endemic fauna of Africa east, south and west of the Sahara Desert.

Some genets can be found in many countries, such as the African – Eurasian common small-spotted (Genetta genetta) and the rusty-spotted panther (Genetta tigrina) genets.

But other genets conduct themselves less as environmental generalists adaptable to a number of habitats and more as environmental specialists focused upon a favorite few niches.
• They therefore end up with less extensive bio-geographies in 1 – 2 countries.
• For example, blotched large-spotted Cape genets know what they like about South Africa’s Cape provinces.

Museo di storia naturale sezione di zoologia (Museum  of Zoology and Natural History) "La Specola," Firenze, Italy
Museo di storia naturale sezione di zoologia (Museum of Zoology and Natural History) "La Specola," Firenze, Italy

 

South Africa appeals to blotched large-spotted Cape genets. Africa’s southernmost country attracts the opportunistic carnivore to diverse niches within such humid, moist, vegetated habitats as:

  • Coastal deciduous, rain, and scrub subtropical forests;
  • Grasslands;
  • Savannah woodlands.

Blotched large-spotted Cape genets avoid:

  • Aridity;
  • Marshiness.

Fynbos (“fine bush,” slender scrub) from Clanwilliam, Western Cape Province to Port Elizabeth, Eastern Cape Province nevertheless belongs on the list of suitable habitats because of:

  • Humid, sheltered pockets of black ironwood (Olea capensis), Clanwilliam (Widdringtonia cedarbergensis) and mountain (W. nodiflora) cypress, and milkwood silver (Leucodendron argenteum) trees;
  • Vegetative cover from cone-, feather-, rice-, and sugar-bushes and from grasses, heaths, pincushions, reeds, and succulents;
  • Winter rain meeting minimal yearly requirements of 17.72+ inches (450+ millimeters).

 

Cape Genets' floral synecology: soaring heights of Black Ironwood (Olea capensis macrocarpa)

Newlands Forest, eastern slopes of Table Mountain, Southern Suburbs of Cape Town, southwestern South Africa
Newlands Forest, eastern slopes of Table Mountain, Southern Suburbs of Cape Town, southwestern South Africa

 

Two genet species appear to be sympatric (“same-ranging”) with blotched large-spotted Capes. The genets in question are among the three holders of classifications which Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle scientist Philippe Gaubert proposes elevating from subspecies to species status. Central African large-spotted letaba genets (currently Genetta maculata letabae, proposed G. letabae) claim within their bio-geographical distributions and ranges:

  • Lesotho;
  • Mozambique;
  • Namibia;
  • South Africa;
  • Swaziland.

Feline small-spotted South African genets (presently G. genetta felina, proposed G. felina) include as homelands:

  • Angola;
  • Namibia;
  • Orange Free State;
  • South Africa;
  • Zambia.

Blotched large-spotted Cape genets join:

  • Feline genets in grasslands;
  • Feline and letabae genets in woodland savannahs.

They resist:

  • Feline genets’ desert-proximitous, dry vlei ("lakelet"), and thicket habitats;
  • Letabae genets’ forest-savannah mosaics.

 

Cape Genet (Genetta tigrina) range in South Africa.

Distribution data from IUCN Red List.
Distribution data from IUCN Red List.

 

All of the 13 – 16 known non-aquatic genet species answer to a basic look of:

  • Alert ears;

  • Big eyes;

  • Dark-spotted bodies;

  • Dark-and-light tails;

  • Short legs;

  • Tapered muzzles.

Variations arise regarding:

  • Flank, head, limb, spot, and tail-tip colors;

  • Densities and distributions of spots;

  • Mid-dorsal and mid-tail lines;

  • Mid-dorsal crests;

  • Numbers and widths of tail bands, rings or stripes.

But both blotched large-spotted Cape and feline small-spotted South African genets display:

  • Large dark chin-lines;

  • Servaline genet-like (G. servalina) mid-dorsal crests;

  • Tail hairs 1.58 – 1.77 inches (40 – 45 millimeters) long.

Both blotched large-spotted Cape and Central African large-spotted letaba genets have:

  • Dark-backed upper legs;

  • Dark-tipped tails. 

 

The Blotched Genet: Genetta tigrina

Richard Lydekker, A Hand-Book to the Carnivora (1896), Part I, Plate XXVIII, opp. p. 219
Richard Lydekker, A Hand-Book to the Carnivora (1896), Part I, Plate XXVIII, opp. p. 219

 

Tails act as inconsistent identifiers for the three sympatric genet species. For example, all three can have the same number of tail rings since the range is:

  • 6 – 8 for Cape genets;

  • 6 – 9 for letaba genets;

  • 8 – 9 for feline genets.

Both Cape and letaba genets claim pale stripes 50 – 75% wider than dark. All three species display mid-tail lines which run longitudinally along the top from base to tip. But the line is barely visible on Cape genets. This feature of the Cape genet's tail joins with two other hallmarks:

  • All-dark inner upper limbs;

  • All-dark lower rear-limbs.

These three identifiers nevertheless may not be noticeable on the super-fast, super-reclusive Cape genet. 

 

Genetta tigrina, known commonly as Cape Genet

St Francis Bay, Eastern Cape Province, South Africa
St Francis Bay, Eastern Cape Province, South Africa

 

Fortunately, no genet communicates blotchiness, large-spottedness, and soft-furredness the way that blotched large-spotted Cape genets do. Cape genet bodies also convey:

  • Black to rusty-red corporeal spotting and mid-dorsal striping;

  • Dark hairiness on all soles;

  • Grey to off-white background;

  • Grey to off-white extremities with all-dark lower rear-limbs and upper inner-sides and dark-backed lower fore-limbs and upper outer-sides.

 

"A Genet (Genetta tigrina) about to spring at a Lourie or Plantain Eater (Turacus corythaix )." (F.W. Fitzsimons)

F.W. Fitzsimons, The Natural History of South Africa: Mammals (1919), Vol. II, opp. p. 4
F.W. Fitzsimons, The Natural History of South Africa: Mammals (1919), Vol. II, opp. p. 4

 

Their heads exhibit:

  • Brown patching around super-sensory whiskers;

  • Clear eyeshine;

  • Dark line running between large, light-colored ears;

  • Dark eyeliner;

  • Dark eyebrows running vertically from the inner and outer sides of both eyes;

  • White banding around moist noses and under dark-adapted eyes.

Their tails mix paler or oranger light bands, rings or stripes with dark. 

 

Large Spotted Genet Genetta tigrina at Cincinnati Zoo
Large Spotted Genet Genetta tigrina at Cincinnati Zoo

 

During 70+-day gestations, mothers build dens:

  • Around boulders;

  • In burrows;

  • Within hollows.

They deliver during the wet-season months from September to March. Grey-furred, 2.15 – 2.89-ounce (61 – 82-gram) twins, triplets or quadruplets experience:

  • Deaf-blindness for 1 – 2-1/2 weeks;

  • Nursing for 4-1/2 weeks;

  • Predation at 28 weeks;

  • Vocalizations: contented purring, “I-am-lost” crying, scary hissing, stressed churring/yapping;

  • Weaning at 32 – 44 weeks.

Physical and sexual maturity involves:

  • Dentition: 12 incisors, 4 canines, 16 premolars, and 8 molars;

  • Head-and-body lengths: 19.29 – 23.62 inches (49 – 60 centimeters);

  • Tail lengths: 16.54 – 21.26 inches (42 – 54 centimeters);

  • Weights: 1.85 – 7.06 pounds (0.84 – 3.2 kilograms).

 

Johann Christian Daniel von Schreber (January 17, 1739 - December 10, 1810) is credited with describing Genetta tigrina in 1776.

Ignaz Dörfler, Botaniker-Porträts (1907), No. 37
Ignaz Dörfler, Botaniker-Porträts (1907), No. 37

Conclusion: Can high-jumping Cape Genets, also diligent as natural grass mowers, hurdle themselves beyond the reach of 21st century challenges of agro-industrialism, climate change, and zealous hunters?

 

Challenges abound since taxonomic descriptions in 1776 by Johann Christian Daniel von Schreber (January 17, 1739 – December 10, 1810), as:

  • Weißensee-born German naturalist;

  • University of Erlangen pharmacologist, 1769-;

  • Die Säugethiere in Abbildungen nach der Natur mit Beschreibungen [“Descriptions of Mammals with Illustrations Drawn from Nature”] publisher, 1774-.

Scientists still admire Cape genets for:

  • Avoiding predatory mammals, raptors, and reptiles;

  • Consuming small arachnids, birds, insects, mammals, and reptiles;

  • Dispersing seeds;

  • Effecting 9.84+-foot (3+-meter) jumps;

  • Mowing grasses (ingested to vomit hair-balls and toxins);

  • Self-defending through back-arching, fur-raising, saliva-balling, and stink-bombing despite 40 teeth and 20 claws.

But legislation and research must problem-solve:

  • Globally-warmed climate change;

  • Over-agro-industrializing;

  • Over-hunting.

 

Cape Genets' endemic faunal terrain: Peninsula Sandstone Fynbos, Cape Peninsula, southwestern South Africa ~

Fynbos refers to natural shrubland or heathland vegetation with exceptional degree of biodiversity and endemism.
Mountain fynbos on the Cape Peninsula
Mountain fynbos on the Cape Peninsula

Acknowledgment

 

My special thanks to:

  • Talented artists and photographers/concerned organizations who make their fine images available on the Internet;
  • Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University for superior on-campus and on-line resources.

 

 

Cape Genets' landscape: Kingdom of Lesotho (Sotho: Muso oa Lesotho)

Landlocked and completely surrounded by South Africa, Lesotho is entirely altitudinous and is rich in water and diamonds.
landscape of Lesotho
landscape of Lesotho

Sources Consulted

 

Anděra, Miloš.1999. České názvy živočichů II. Savci (Mammalia). Prague: Národní muzeum, (zoologické odd.).

Arnold, Michael L. 2008. Reticulate Evolution and Humans: Origins and Ecology. Oxford University Press.

Bisby, F.A.; Roskov, Y.R.; Orrell, T.M.; Nicolson, D.; Paglinawan, L.E.; Bailly, N.; Kirk, P.M.; Bourgoin, T.; Baillargeon, G.; Ouvrard, D. (red.). 2011. “Genetta tigrina.” Species 2000 & ITIS Catalogue of Life: 2011 Annual Checklist. Reading, UK. Retrieved May 31, 2014.

  • Available at: http://www.catalogueoflife.org/col/search/all/key/Genetta+tigrina/match/0
  • Available at: http://www.catalogueoflife.org/col/details/species/id/6902628
  • Available at: http://www.catalogueoflife.org/col/details/species/id/7005193
  • Available at: http://www.catalogueoflife.org/col/details/species/id/7005192

"Blotched Genet." HowStuffWorks: Animals > Wild Animals. Retrieved May 31, 2014.

  • Available at: http://animals.howstuffworks.com/mammals/blotchgenet.htm

Boelens, Bo; Watkins, Michael; and Grayson, Michael. 2009. The Eponym Dictionary of Mammals. Johns Hopkins University.

Boschi, Giovanni. 1863 - 1879. Atlante Zoologico Popolare. Naples: Raimondo Petroroja.

Boudet, Ch. 10 January 2009. "Species Sheet: South African Genet, Rusty Spotted Genet, Blotched Genet, Large Spotted Genet, Cape Genet, South African Large-spotted Genet." Mammals' Planet: Vs n°4, 04/2010. Retrieved May 31, 2014.

  • Available at: http://www.planet-mammiferes.org/drupal/en/node/38?indice=Genetta+tigrina

Boudet, Ch. 10 January 2009. "Subspecies Sheet: Large Spotted Genet." Mammals' Planet: Vs n°4, 04/2010. Retrieved May 31, 2014. 

  • Available at: http://www.planet-mammiferes.org/drupal/en/node/39?indice=Genetta+tigrina+tigrina

Boudet, Ch. 10 January 2009. "Subspecies Sheet: Lesotho Large-sptted Genet." Mammals' Planet: Vs n°4, 04/2010. Retrieved May 31, 2014. 

  • Available at: http://www.planet-mammiferes.org/drupal/en/node/39?indice=Genetta+tigrina+methi

Boudet, Ch. 10 January 2009. "Subspecies Sheet: Mozambique Bush Genet, Mozambique Large-spotted Genet." Mammals' Planet: Vs n°4, 04/2010. Retrieved May 31, 2014. 

  • Available at: http://www.planet-mammiferes.org/drupal/en/node/39?indice=Genetta+tigrina+mossambica

Cassell's Universal Portrait Gallery: A Collection of Portraits of Celebrities, English and Foreign. With Facsimile Autographs. 1895. London, Paris & Melbourne: Cassell and Company, Limited.

  • Available via Internet Archive at: https://archive.org/details/cassellsuniversa00londiala

Coetzee, C.G. 22 August 1977. “Order Carnivora.” Pp. 1-42 in 1971-1977. The Mammals of Africa: An Identification Manual. Part 8 edited by J. Meester and H.W. Setzer. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press.  

Corson, Docteur P.-J. October 2005. Les grands prédateurs d’Afrique: biologie, éthnologie et chasse. Brussels, Belgium: Éditions du Gerfaut.

Crawford-Cabral, J. 1981. “A New Classification of the Genets.” African Small Mammal Newsletter 6:8-10.  

Crawford-Cabral, João. 1980. "The Classification of the Genets (Carnivora, Viverridae, genus Genetta)." Boletim da Sociedade Portuguesa de Ciências Naturais 20:97-114.

de Pousarges, E. (Eugène). 1896. "Étude sur les mammifères du Congo français." Annales des Sciences Naturelles, Zoologie et Paléontologie; comprenant l'Anatomie, la Physiologie, la Classification et l'histoire Naturelle des Animaux, (série 8, tome troisième): 129-416.

  • Available via Biodiversity Heritage Library at: http://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/35662106
  • Available via Internet Archive at: http://archive.org/stream/udesurlesmammifs00pous#page/n6/mode/1up

Dörfler, Ignaz. 1907. Botaniker-Porträts. Wien (Vienna), Austria: I. Dörfler.

Driver, Stephanie (ed.). 2008. Exploring Mammals, Volume 3. Tarrytown, NY: Marshall Cavendish Corporation.

Duff, Andrew; and Lawson, Ann. 2004. Mammals of the World: A Checklist. Yale University Press.

Ewer, R.F. 1998. The Carnivores. Cornell University Press: Cornell Paperbacks.

Fitzsimons, F.W. (Frederick William). 1919. The Natural History of South Africa, Including Civets, Genets, Mungooses, Meerkats, Earth Wolves, Hyenas, Jackals, Foxes, Wild Dogs, Otters, Honey Ratels, Muishonds, and Sea Lions: Mammals. In Four Volumes. Volume II. London: Longmans, Green and Co.

  • Available via Biodiversity Heritage Library at: http://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/9397720
  • Available via Internet Archive at: https://archive.org/details/naturalhistoryofsa02fitz

Gaubert, Philippe; and Dufour, Sylvain. July 2013. “First Report of a Chinchilla Phenotype in Viverridae (Carnivora).” Small Carnivore Conservation 48:92-95. Retrieved May 31, 2014.

  • Available at: http://www.smallcarnivoreconservation.org/home/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/SCC-48-11-Gaubert-Dufour.pdf

Gaubert, P.; and Hoffmann, M. 2008. "Genetta tigrina." In: IUCN 2013. International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. Retrieved May 31, 2014.

  • Available at: http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/full/41702/0

Gaubert, P.; Chalubert, A.; and Dubus, G. 2008. “An Interactive Identification Key for Genets and Oyans (Carnivora, Viverridae, Genettinae, Genetta spp. and Poiana spp.) Using Xper2.” Zootaxa 1717:39-50.

Gaubert, P.; Fernandes, C. A.; Bruford, M. W.; and Veron, G. 2004. "Genets (Carnivora, Viverridae) in Africa: An Evolutionary Synthesis Based on Cytochrome b Sequences and Morphological Characters." Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 81:589-610.

Gaubert, P.; Papeş, M.; Peterson, A.T. June 2006. "Natural History Collections and the Conservation of Poorly Known Taxa: Ecological Niche Modeling in Central African Rainforest Genets (Genetta spp.)." Biological Conservation 130(1):106–117.

Gaubert, P.; Taylor, P.J.; and Veron, G. 2005. “Integrative Taxonomy and Phylogenetic Systematics of the Genets (Carnivora, Viverridae, Genetta): A New Classification of the Most Speciose Carnivoran Genus in Africa.” Pp. 371-384 in African Biodiversity: Molecules, Organisms, Ecosystems edited by Bernard A. Huber, Bradley J. Sinclair, and Karl-Heinz Lampe. NY: Springer Science + Business Media, Inc.

Gaubert, Philippe; Weltz, Marjorie; and Chalubert, Antoine. 14 January 2008. “Genetta tigrina." Genets and Oyans. Paris: Université Pierre et Marie Curie. Retrieved May 31, 2014. 

  • Available at: http://lis-upmc.snv.jussieu.fr/genettes/web/fiches_en/taxa/genetta_tigrina.html

"Genet." AWF: What We Do > Wildlife Conservation > Genet. African Wildlife Foundation. Retrieved May 31, 2014.

  • Available at: http://www.awf.org/wildlife-conservation/genet

Genetta tigrina.” The Marine Biological Universal Biological Indexer and Organizer. Retrieved May 31, 2014.

  • Available at: http://www.ubio.org/browser/search.php?search_all=genetta+tigrina
  • Available at: http://www.ubio.org/browser/details.php?namebankID=2478474
  • Available at: http://www.ubio.org/browser/details.php?namebankID=105806
  • Available at: http://www.ubio.org/browser/details.php?namebankID=7104056
  • Available at: http://www.ubio.org/browser/details.php?namebankID=6864572
  • Available at: http://www.ubio.org/browser/details.php?namebankID=11271987
  • Available at: http://www.ubio.org/browser/details.php?namebankID=6877871
  • Available at: http://www.ubio.org/browser/details.php?namebankID=11271986
  • Available at: http://www.ubio.org/browser/details.php?namebankID=11271985

Genetta tigrina.” The National Center for Biotechnology Information: Taxonomy ID220101. Retrieved May 31, 2014.

  • Available at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Taxonomy/Browser/wwwtax.cgi

"Genetta tigrina: Large-Spotted Genet." Biodiversity Explorer: The Web of Life in Southern Africa Highlights > Mammals > Placentalia (Placental Mammals) > Ferungulata > Ferae > Carnivora > Viverridae. Retrieved May 31, 2014.

  • Available at: http://www.biodiversityexplorer.org/mammals/carnivora/genetta_tigrina.htm

Genetta tigrina: Large Spotted Genet.” Encyclopedia of Life. Retrieved May 31, 2014.

  • Available at: http://eol.org/pages/328100/details

Genetta tigrina Schreber, 1776.” ITIS Report: Taxonomic Serial Number 726260. Integrated Taxonomic Information System. Retrieved May 31, 2014.

  • Available at: http://www.itis.gov/servlet/SingleRpt/SingleRpt?search_topic=TSN&search_value=621996

"Genetta tigrina (South African Large-spotted Genet)." ZipcodeZoo: Species Identifier 128452. Retrieved May 31, 2014. 

  • Available at: http://zipcodezoo.com/animals/g/genetta_tigrina/

Gervais, Paul. 1855. Histoire naturelle des Mammifères: Carnivores, Proboscidiens, Jumentés, Bisulques, Édentés, Marsupiaux, Monotrèmes, Phoques, Sirénides et Cétacés. Paris: L. Curmer.

Gittleman, John L.; Funk, Stephan M.; Macdonald, David; and Wayne, Robert K. (eds.). 2001. Carnivore Conservation. Cambridge University Press: Conservation Biology 5.

Hayssen, Virginia; Van Tienhoven, Ari; and Van Tienoven, Ans. Asdell’s Patterns of Mammalian Reproduction: A Compendium of Species-Specific Data. Cornell University, 1993.

Heijnis, Charlotte. 2014. "Southern Africa: Eastern Shore of South Africa." World Wildlife Fund: Places > Ecoregions > Terrestrial Ecoregions > Tropical and Subtropical Moist Broadleaf Forests. Retrieved May 31, 2014.

  • Available at: http://www.worldwildlife.org/ecoregions/at0116

Hunter, Luke; and Barrett, Priscilla. 2011. A Field Guide to the Carnivores of the World. London, Cape Town, Sydney, Auckland: New Holland Publishers (UK) Ltd.

Jennings, A. P.; and Veron, J. 2009. "Family Viverridae (Civets, Genets, and Oyans)." In: Don E. Wilson and Russel Mittermeier (Hrsg.) Handbook of the Mammals of the World Volume 1: Carnivores. Lynx Edicions.

Jukofsky, Diane for the Rainforest Alliance. 2002. Encyclopedia of Rainforests. Westport, CT: Oryx Press.

Kayanja, F.; and Schliemann, H. 1981. "Sebaceous Glands of the Anal Sacs of Genetta tigrina (Schreber, 1778)." Zeitschrift fur Saugetierkunde 46:26-35.

Kingdon, Jonathon; Happold, David; Butynski, Thomas; Hoffmann, Michael; Happold, Meredith; and Jan Kalina (eds.). 2013. Mammals of Africa, Volume 5: Carnivores, Pangolins, Equids and Rhinoceroses, edited by Jonathan Kingdon and Michael Hoffmann. Bloomsbury Publishing.

Kirkwood, Don. 2014. "Southeastern Africa: Mozambique, Swaziland, and South Africa." World Wildlife Fund: Places > Ecoregions > Terrestrial Ecoregions > Tropical and Subtropical Moist Broadleaf Forests. Retrieved May 31, 2014.

  • Available at: http://www.worldwildlife.org/ecoregions/at0119

Kondo, H.; Tesar, J.; Cloud, D.; Kagan, L. (eds.). 1972. Civets, Genets, and Linsangs, Volume 2, 3rd Edition. Milan: Fratelli Fabbri Editori.

“Large-Spotted Genet.” The Animal Files: Mammals > Carnivores. Retrieved May 31, 2014.

  • Available at: http://www.theanimalfiles.com/mammals/carnivores/genet_large_spotted.html

"Large-Spotted Genet: Genetta tigrina." ARKive: Species > Mammals. Retrieved May 31, 2014.

  • Available at: http://www.arkive.org/large-spotted-genet/genetta-tigrina/

Larivière, Serge. 2004. "Blotched Genet: Genetta tigrina, Spanish: Jineta de motas grandes." P. 344 in Grzimek's Animal Life Encyclopedia, Second Edition. Volume 14: Mammals III, edited by Michael Hutchins, Devra G. Kleiman, Valerius Geist, and Melissa C. McDade. Farmington Hills, MI: Gale Group, Inc., division of Thomson Learning Inc.

Lydekker, Richard. 1896. A Handbook to the Carnivora, Part I Cats, Civets, and Mungooses. Edward Lloyd's Natural History. London: Edward Lloyd, Limited.

  • Available via Biodiversity Heritage Library at: http://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/14819661
  • Available via Internet Archive at: https://archive.org/details/handbooktocarniv00lydekke

Majchrowska, Anna; and Papińska, Elżbieta. Fynbos of South Africa. Retrieved May 31, 2014.

  • Available at: http://www.rusnauka.com/8_NIT_2008/Tethis/Geographia/26095.doc.htm

Makenbach, Sarah. 2014. "Genetta tigrina: Cape Large-Spotted Genet (Also: Cape Genet; South African Large-Spotted Genet; Blotched Genet)." Animal Diversity Web (On-line). University of Michigan Museum of Zoology. Retrieved May 31, 2014.

  • Available at: http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/accounts/Genetta_tigrina/

Myers, P.; Espinosa, R.; Parr, C.S.; Jones, T.; Hammond, G.S.; and Dewey, T.A. 2014. “Genetta tigrina: Cape Large-Spotted Genet (Also: Cape Genet; South African Large-Spotted Genet; Blotched Genet).” The Animal Diversity Web (online). University of Michigan Museum of Zoology. Retrieved May 31, 2014.

  • Available at: http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/accounts/Genetta_tigrina/classification/#Genetta_tigrina

Nowak, Ronald M. 1999. Walker's Mammals of the World, Sixth Edition. Volume I. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. 

Roberts, P.; Somers, M.; White, R.; Nel, J. 2007. “Diet of the South African Large-Spotted Genet Genetta tigrina (Carnivora, Viverridae) in a Coastal Dune Forest.” Acta theriologica 52(1):45-53.

Rosevear, Donovan Reginald. 1974. The Carnivores of West Africa. London: Trustees of the British Museum (Natural History).

  • Available via Biodiversity Heritage Library at: http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/35416#page/7/mode/1up

Rowe-Rowe. D. 1971. "The Development and Behaviour of a Rusty Spotted Genet, Genetta rubignosa Puckeran." The Lammergeyer 13:29-43.

Schreber, J. C. D. 1777. "Die Säugthiere in Abbildungen nach der Natur mit Beschreibungen 1776-1778." Wolfgang Walther, Erlangen, 3:377-440, pls. 104B, 107Aa, 109B, 110B, 115B, 125B, 127B, 136, 146A.

Seymour, Colleen. 2014. "Southern Africa: Southern South Africa." World Wildlife Fund: Places > Ecoregions > Terrestrial Ecoregions > Tropical and Subtropical Moist Broadleaf Forests. Retrieved May 31, 2014.

  • Available at: http://www.worldwildlife.org/ecoregions/at0115

Taylor, M. 1970. "Locomotion in Some East African Viverrids." Journal of Mammalogy 51(1):42-51.

Veron, Geraldine. 2010. “Phylogeny of the Viverridae and ‘Viverrid-like’ Feliforms.” Pp. 64-90 in Carnivoran Evolution: New Views on Phylogeny, Form and Function edited by Anjali Goswami and Anthony Friscia. Cambridge University Press: Cambridge Studies in Morphology and Molecules.

Wemmer, Christen M. 1972. Comparative Ethology of the Large-spotted Genet, Genetta Tigrina, and Related Viverrid Genera. College Park: University of Maryland.

Wilson, Don E.; and Cole, F. Russell. 2000. Common Names of Mammals of the World. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press.

Wilson, Don E.; and Reeder, DeeAnn M. (editors). 2005. Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed), Johns Hopkins University Press.

Wrobel, Murray (Editor). 2007. Elsevier's Dictionary of Mammals: Latin English German French Italian. Oxford, U.K.: Elsevier B.V.

 

Cape Genets' landscape: southwestern South Africa's West Coast National Park in Western Cape province borders Atlantic Ocean and is aflutter as an Important BirdLife International Bird Area.

Granite formations overlooking Langebaan Lagoon
Granite formations overlooking Langebaan Lagoon
the end which is also the beginning
the end which is also the beginning

Blotched/Cape /Large- spotted Genet walking on forest floor, Ruaha National Park, central Tanzania: photo by Michele Menegon

10x14 Photo Puzzle with 252 pieces. Packed in black cardboard box 5 5/8 x 7 5/8 x 1 1/5. Puzzle image 5x7 affixed to box top.
Photo Jigsaw Puzzle - Ardea Wildlife Pets

Cape Genet (Genetta Tigrina) with Young on Back

Cape Genet Genetta Tigrina with Young on Back, Illustration

Me and my purrfectly purrfect Maine coon kittycat, Augusta "Gusty" Sunshine

Gusty and I thank you for reading this article and hope that our product selection interests you; Gusty Gus receives favorite treats from my commissions.
DerdriuMarriner, All Rights Reserved
DerdriuMarriner, All Rights Reserved
Updated: 08/20/2014, DerdriuMarriner
 
Thank you! Would you like to post a comment now?
3

Comments


   Login
DerdriuMarriner on 06/11/2014

Mira, Yes, the African - Eurasian common small-spotted genet (Genetta genetta) can be found perfectly naturalized in France, Portugal, and Spain (along with recent introductions into Belgium, Germany, Italy, and Switzerland). Scientists generally consider the Iberian Peninsula's introductions as having been effected particularly during Roman conquests, Moorish invasions, and Crusader homecomings.

Yes, the number of species and subspecies for the genet currently faces review. National Natural History Museum mammalogist Dr. Philippe Gaubert's cutting-edge technology (more accurate ways of measuring key body parts, such as skull bones ) indicates that 3 non-aquatic subspecies -- the feline (G. genetta felina) with the common genet (G. genetta) as well as the letabae (G. maculata letabae) and Schouteden's (G. maculata schoutedeni) with the rusty-spotted panther (G. maculata) -- need to be upgraded to 3 separate species. If accepted by taxonomic reviewers, the revision will increase the number of non-aquatic genet species from 13 to 16. It will result in greater attention and more funding for the 3 genets in question since a subspecies -- other than the nominate ("first-named"), G. genetta genetta and G. maculata maculata here -- rarely attracts the interest and the research that a species does.

Mira on 06/01/2014

So there's one species native or naturalized to Eurasia. I'll look for it next time I go to The Museum of Natural History here. I'm confused though about you saying "the 13-16 non-aquatic species of genets." Why 13-16? Do scientists doubt that some of them are different species?

You might also like

Common European Small-Spotted Genets (Genetta genetta): Linnae...

Spots and stripes act as camouflage. They also advise of scented communicatio...

Jan Moninckx and Ivy-Leafed Geranium: Capturing South African ...

South Africa's ivy-leafed geranium (Pelargonium peltatum): illustrated by Dut...


Disclosure: This page generates income for authors based on affiliate relationships with our partners, including Amazon, Google and others.
Loading ...
Error!