A limn about Lymm

by Veronica

A limn is a description in words and pictures and so what better word to use in a post about the beautiful village of Lymm in Cheshire than a "limn about Lymm."

Lymm is a village in North Cheshire, its name deriving from the Celtic words meaning place by running water which suggests there was a stream running through the area.

It was the site of my walk today.There are several old buildings and a notable landmark in the area and I have taken picture of a few of these but most of this is about a circular walk starting in Lymm village and returning to the start.

The man made Bridgewater Canal runs through this area and the circular walk starts and finishes close to it.

Lymm is about 25 minutes drive from my house.

Lymm Cross
Lymm Cross
veronica's photo
Lymm Cross, steps and stocks
Lymm Cross, steps and stocks
Veronica's photo
Me in the stocks
Me in the stocks
Veronica's photo

Specally for Mira

Specially for Mira. me in the stocks. The stocks in action !

Lymm Stocks and Cross

Lymm is one of my favourite villages in Cheshire.

In the centre of the village stands a very unusual monument.  Lymm Cross is a grade 1 listed monument  sitting on old sandstone steps.

The cross replaced a 17th century one and was built to commemorate Queen Victoria's 60th jubilee in 1897.The  stone steps suggest that the cross was medieval in origin although  they do date back to Saxon times. The worn steps are certainly much older than the 1897  monument.  It has been suggested  that it was placed  on the site of a Roman shrine to Minerva.  Certainly It is one of the few crosses left locally.Crosses were intended  to remind people about their faith as they went about their daily lives.  They were also used as crossroad markers or denoted marketplaces.

To one side of the cross stand the stocks which are a replacement for the original stocks dating from the 18th century. The stocks were traditionally a means of public punishment.

The Dingle
The Dingle
Veronica's photo
Village duck pond
Village duck pond
Veronica's photo

The Dingle and Duck Pond

Through the village we pass the centre with a duck pond and then we turned into The Dingle. This is a beautiful woodland walk up to Lymm Dam.

Lymm Dam
Lymm Dam
Veronica's photo
Lymm Dam
Lymm Dam
veronica's photo

Lymm Dam

Lymm Dam is a lake that was created in 1824 by a dam project.

Post box

This post box if you look carefully has GR written on it and this shows that it was built and put there in the time of King George V who was king from 1910 to 1936.

King George post box
King George post box
Veronica's Photo

Cheshire farm land

The walk goes through, village,  woodland and comes out eventually into Cheshire farmland,  gold with ripening wheat.

There are tiny bridges over the streams in the fields and hedges.

Cheshire farmland
Cheshire farmland
Veronica's photo
A tiny bridge
A tiny bridge
Veronica's Photo

The Bridgewater Canal

The walk then moves over to finish off by the canal.  There are many beautiful houseboats  and people live in them. There are bridges, wild flowers and of course Cheshire wild blackberries.

The canal
The canal
Veronica's Photo
Houseboats
Houseboats
Veronica's Photo
Wild blackberries
Wild blackberries
Veronica's Photo
Wild flowers
Wild flowers
Veronica's Photos

Houses and cobbled streets

There are beautiful homes and little streets and alleyways along the way, which for me of course all ends with ... a cup of tea.

 

 

Canalside house
Canalside house
Veronica's Photo
Cottages by the canal
Cottages by the canal
Veronica's Photo
A cobbled street
A cobbled street
Veronica's Photo
Sexton's tea shop
Sexton's tea shop
Veronica's photo
Updated: 10/25/2015, Veronica
 
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Veronica on 09/10/2015

There is plenty wildlife in Lymm . The canal didn't look too clean to me though :) It wouldn't pass my standards !

frankbeswick on 09/10/2015

You mention the Bridgewater Canal flowing through Lymm. Since the authorities cleaned it up it has been a haven for wildlife. My father spotted otters on the canal some years ago. Geese and ducks are found all along it, and I believe that there could well be kingfishers. You will certainly see heron near the canal, as they are becoming more abundant in our region. I have seen them in Stretford, and remember that the Bridgewater runs not far from my house on its way through to meet the ship canal, so they can easily move along the waterway.

In the region of North Cheshire I have seen nuthatches and jays. The nuthatch looks a bit like kingfisher and is the only bird able to walk down a tree because of its peculiar arrangement of claws.

Veronica on 09/10/2015

Fantastic . Your knowledge is astonishing

frankbeswick on 09/10/2015

Scriptural carvings are a classic sign of a Celtic cross. While the Sandbach crosses date from the Saxon era, they seem to reflect Celtic [Irish] religious influence. This would have come down from Holy Island in Northumbria, for it was from this Iona-inspired monastery that North Cheshire, then in Mercia, was converted. Iona was an Irish foundation in Scotland that spread its influence across the north of Britain.

Veronica on 09/10/2015

The Sandbach crosses are incredible and still have Scriptural carvings on them evident. They are Saxon it is believed

Frank your wish is my command , I shall do one but am working today.

Maybe as you have retired you could have a drive out that way, see the crosses, a walk and a lunch with your dear wife. A grand day out.

frankbeswick on 09/10/2015

I have not seen that stone, so what you say confirms that this is a Celtic cross site. Do a post on the Sandbach crosses. I have not seen them and have only visited Sandbach once.

Veronica on 09/10/2015

Also Frank take a look at the ancient stone underneath the monument. That is sandstone and a very very old installation.

Veronica on 09/10/2015

Indeed but as I am unsure of the origins I did not wish to specify.

The site as known as Lymm Cross even after te cross had gone and then Queen Victoria's monument is still known as Lymm Cross.

Your comment about the Celtic missionaries is a good and valid one and I agree. The other main crosses round here would be the Sandbach Crosses which are incredible and I may do a post on those as a result of this Lymm one.

frankbeswick on 09/10/2015

You mention the antiquity of the cross. While the age is, as you say, unclear, we must remember that the area around Lymm was converted by Irish missionaries who brought Celtic Christianity, and these monks would have brought their practice of erecting Celtic crosses, so the presence of a cross of early date is a justifiable claim. You might recall that the Lymm cross is not the only cross in the broader area. There used to be one near Styal which people called the Saxon Cross, until it was destroyed by a lorry, and both seem to represent the presence of a Celtic cross culture round there. So my personal view is that the crosses date back to the time when the Celtic Church was converting Mercia,[the English kingdom to which Lymm belonged] which would have been after 625 when the Northumbrian victory at Chester brought the influence of the Celtic [Irish] Christian Northumbrians to the area.

Veronica on 09/09/2015

It is indeed popular for angling; we saw anglers in fact and there was a large sign warning people that they need a rod licence.


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