Deer at Dunham Massey, Cheshire

by Veronica

We had a lovely walk today around the deer reservation at Dunham Massey in Cheshire. The deer were everywhere just walking around amongst everyone.

This lovely park is Paul's area of the world more than mine but I had a lovely day here today. The first mention of Dunham's deer park was in 1353. The deer at Dunham Massey Park today are fallow deer and are quite tame around visitors. People were strolling around amongst the deer. The deer park is to the south of the Hall.

Dunham Massey Park is owned by the National Trust. The park is largely wooded and has a Hall, a mill, lakes and gardens too.

The trees there are of particular significance as many are very old, some being over 300 years old.

Interestingly, the park runs along the straight old Roman road from Chester to the York , both major Roman garrison forts. But this was hundreds of years before the de Mascey family developed Dunham Massey. There were 3 Massey castles in the south of the district hundreds of years ago.

Look at the age of this tree trunk
Look at the age of this tree trunk

Trees

and the deer park

The tree above is fenced off because it is so old. Look at the girth of the tree trunk. It must be very old. The back and side of the house are behind.

The deer have beautiful faces and colouring. They have these speckled backs and are gentle creatures walking around the visitors.

The Deer

The deer are just beautiful, calmly wandering round.  Visitors are asked not to go onto their reservation but many deer walk out of it towards the house and visitors, who are very respectful and careful around them.

beautiful colouring on the deer
beautiful colouring on the deer
the antlers were large
the antlers were large

Antlers

The antlers on these deer were huge for their heads and must have been quite mature.

deer park
deer park
the deer walk around the visitors
the deer walk around the visitors

1616 house

Above,  the deer were wandering around in front of the beautiful house in the background which was built in 1616 by Sir George Booth.

The latest family to own the hall were descendants of Lady Jane Grey's family. Lady Jane Grey was England's queen who was executed aged approx.15, after 9 days on the throne in Tudor times.

Other wildlife

Although "wild" other creatures are also relatively well accustomed to having visitors around the park. This swan stayed exactly where it was, sitting by the side of the old moat as I went close to it.

very calm swan on the bank
very calm swan on the bank

The House

Dunham Massey Hall
Dunham Massey Hall

The Mill

Dunham's water mill was built in the 1860's but it was replacing an earlier mill, the first of which was noted in 14th century.

The Mill
The Mill
mill wheel working
mill wheel working
water wheel
water wheel

The clock tower

The clock tower from 1721
The clock tower from 1721

The clock tower was built above the stables and has the date 1721 around it, one number in each corner.

The house is open to visitors and I especially enjoyed seeing the kitchens, laundry and dairy at the back; the place where the hub-bub of the house went on day in day out.

This is a must-visit if you are in the area or indeed NW England.

Christmas at Dunham Massey

For those interested in visiting the park around Christmas there will eb lots of events. The link is here.

https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/events/47f674b9-5654-4012-bc8e-3f8fba2c2708/pages/details

Updated: 10/01/2016, Veronica
 
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Veronica on 10/01/2016

I have added a Christmas events link for those who are interested or able to visit Dunham Massey over the festive period.

frankbeswick on 09/29/2016

When we were in Norway the locals warned us of driving the mountains at night, as collisions with an elk in the dark are often fatal, but elk are far larger and heavier than fallow deer are. There are warning signs on some English roads about the presence of deer running across the road.

Veronica on 09/29/2016

I haven't heard of it in England though. I have heard comments in American films about cars colliding with deer but I haven't encountered it here before.

frankbeswick on 09/29/2016

Colliding with a deer has been fatal for drivers in some instances. But only tractors operated by National Trust workers can get into the park, so both humans and deer are safe.

Veronica on 09/29/2016

Oh my goodness. That sounds dangerous. These are all securely in an enclosed park and there are no cars driving around. It is all gated but I can imagine colliding with a deer whilst driving would be startling.

Thanks for your photo comment.

jptanabe on 09/28/2016

Lovely photos! I remember visiting Glamis Castle where there were deer when I was young. Unfortunately where I live now deer run wild and often collide with cars on the road.

Veronica on 09/27/2016

Yes this is intriguing. Derdriu's comment about their tails was interesting.

frankbeswick on 09/27/2016

What strikes me is that whenever the deer race across the paths there has never been, to the best of my knowledge, a collision between them and a human.

Veronica on 09/27/2016

Frank
Yes but tell that to the deer . :) Humans keep off their patch but the deer just wander everywhere. It's a lovely experience.

Veronica on 09/27/2016

Derdriu
Heck I never knew that. Thank you so much. Having Wizzley is like having a fountain of world knowledge.

I do feel very blessed and privileged to have so much beauty around where we live. It's worth the cold. We just put on more clothes.


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