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Anyone have a grown kid moving back home?

 
dustytoes
Posts: 1140
Message
on 08/29/2013

My daughter just moved back home to save some money.  It has been an adjustment for all of us, but I tell her she is lucky to have the opportunity to do so.

These days, with jobs not easy to find and pay low I think more and more kids are resorting to live with parents again. 


RupertTaylor
Posts: 108
Message
on 08/29/2013

First born son, 30, has never left. Although possessing two college diplomas (business and electronic engineering) he cannot find a job that pays him enough to be self-supporting. He's currently underemployed, and consequently underpaid, in the electronics field. Employers bellyache that they can't find qualified technicians; it would be more accurate to say that they can't find qualified technicians who can afford to work for the wages they offer. So, it's left to the parents to subsidize the corporations by providing accommodation.

We would never tell our son he's lucky to have us to support him; we feel we're lucky to be in a position to do so.

ologsinquito
Posts: 418
Message
on 08/29/2013

Dustytoes,

I've read something like 85 percent of young adults in the US are now living at home. So this isn't unusual. You'll probably enjoy having her there.


chefkeem
Admin
Posts: 3394
Message
on 08/29/2013

I did it the other way around, and it works great: I moved into a 1-bedroom efficiency with all my ex-wives and kids. My rent-share is now $14.23.  Cool


Achim "Chef Keem" Thiemermann is the co-founder of a pretty cool new platform called...um...er...oh, yeah - Wizzley.com.
WordChazer
Posts: 412
Message
on 08/29/2013

I moved out of my parents' age 18 to go to University at the other end of the country. Then I moved back with £20 to my name upon graduation, 3 years later.

I stayed for another 7 years, moving out in the mid-90s for my own one-bed flat (OK, apartment).

I then met the man who is now my husband in the early 2000s and moved away for what I hope is for good, almost 9 years ago. We still see as much as we can of our respective parents, although neither of us want to stay with them for more than a few days at a time.

It was hard enough moving back home after Uni, never mind if we had to contemplate it now, having owned our place for several years.

I feel for all of you and I wish you tolerance, patience, luck and happiness.


Described by one of my clients as 'a literary grammarian', writing, researching and reading are requirements for sanity, at least this side of the keyboard.
dustytoes
Posts: 1140
Message
on 08/29/2013

 

RupertTaylor: 08/29/2013 - 09:27 AM

We would never tell our son he's lucky to have us to support him; we feel we're lucky to be in a position to do so.

Ah, you misunderstand me.  I say she is lucky to have the opportunity to live with her parents.  My parents divorced right after I moved out and I have never had the chance to do what my daughter is doing.  I don't think of it as supporting her, but giving her a hand up in this mess of a world.

My hat is off to parents who make the sacrifices to help their kids make their lives better.  And I am thankful I can do so, as you are.


dustytoes
Posts: 1140
Message
on 08/29/2013

 

chefkeem: 08/29/2013 - 12:01 PM

I did it the other way around, and it works great: I moved into a 1-bedroom efficiency with all my ex-wives and kids. My rent-share is now $14.23.  Cool

Oh my..... what to say to this???


chefkeem
Admin
Posts: 3394
Message
on 08/29/2013

Just being silly, Pam. Again. Embarassed


Achim "Chef Keem" Thiemermann is the co-founder of a pretty cool new platform called...um...er...oh, yeah - Wizzley.com.
dustytoes
Posts: 1140
Message
on 08/30/2013

 

chefkeem: 08/29/2013 - 09:36 PM

Just being silly, Pam. Again. Embarassed

Of course.  I knew that... ;)


AlexandriaIngham
Posts: 109
Message
on 08/31/2013

I moved out when I was 16 and only went back for school holidays. After graduating, I was one of the lucky few to find a decent paying job and then met my now-husband. We ended up moving to Dundee from Birmingham since he couldn't find a job and then found ourselves homeless for a few months while waiting for his university decision.

We had to move in with his parents for those four months and it was the hardest thing for me. Luckily, we lived in their caravan but since I worked from home, I spent most of the days their home to work.

My sister, on the other hand, has never left our parents' home. They get her to contribute to some of the food costs, especially now that she finally has a full-time job, but I don't think she'll ever really move out. I have a friend who's two years older than me and also still living with her parents, despite having a full-time job because the pay isn't enough for her to move out--even though she really wants to.

There are a lot of parents now with adult children at home so you're definitely not alone.

BrendaReeves
Posts: 845
Message
on 08/31/2013

If nothing else, the economy is bringing the family back together. That's what family is all about.


Brenda Reeves
ologsinquito
Posts: 418
Message
on 08/31/2013

Yes, these times are helping some families become closer, or at least spend more time together.


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