Three Deer Proof Old Garden Moss Roses: General Kleber, Louis Gimard, and Madame de La Roche Lambert

by DerdriuMarriner

Not all roses attract deer. Those whose lineages go back to before 1867 get called old garden roses. Deer keep away from lawns planted with Gimard, Kleber, and Roche-Lambert roses.

Old garden roses appear as fresh as other floral varieties. They are called old for having lineages pre-dating the benchmark year 1867. Their look, scent, and taste bespeak welcome contributions to and wonderful feats in arbors, gardens, and yards.
• For example, old garden roses count among the plants which deer generally avoid.

Cultivators and gardeners usually do not have to worry about deer gazing or grazing longingly upon such attractive old garden rose varieties as:
• Général Kléber;
• Louis Gimard;
• Madame de La Roche-Lambert.

Two physical features which characterize old garden roses in general and the above-mentioned trio in particular explain their lack of appeal to deer:
• Old garden roses smell strong (but sweet);
• They tend to ramble.

*****

 

Général Kléber’s roses exist as the invention in 1856 of Biarritz-born rosarian Monsieur Robert, as:

  • Angers foreman to Paris-born rosarian Jean-Pierre Vibert (January 31, 1777 – January 18, 1866), 1845-;
  • Vibert nursery owner, 1851-.

They expect:

  • Full or partial sun;
  • Height-equivalent spacing;
  • Pruning of damaged branches after spring / summer blooms;
  • Slightly moist loam;
  • Soil pH of 5.6 – 6.5;
  • Temperatures between -30°F (-34.4°C) and 86°F (30°C).

They offer:

  • Clustered or individual, double, 40+-petaled, 3.94-inch (10-centimeter), rose-pink, salmon-tinted flowers showcasing central button-eyes, quartered rosettes, silver-pink undersides;
  • Height and width of 4 - 6 feet (1.2 – 1.85 meters) each;
  • Mint-green, rough leaves;
  • Moss-covered, pine-scented bristles, buds, sepals, stalks;
  • Propagation by budding, cutting, grafting, suckering;
  • Smooth stems;
  • Strong, sweet scent.

 

Portrait of Jean Baptiste Kléber: honored namesake of Rosa 'Général Kléber'

oil on canvas: ancient copy of miniature by Jean Urbain Guérin (1761 - 1836
Musée historique de Strasbourg, Alsace Region, northeastern France
Musée historique de Strasbourg, Alsace Region, northeastern France

 

Rosa Général Kléber claims vigorous life cycles and natural histories. The name commemorates Strasbourg-born architect, linguist, and officer Jean-Baptiste Kléber (March 9, 1753 – June 14, 1800). The career of the French and German language speaker epitomizes:

  • Environmentalism, as Arc de Triomphe designer Jean-François-Thérèse Chalgrin’s (1739 – January 21, 1811) student, 1772 – 1774, and Saint-Erhard de Thann health center / municipal building designer, 1787 - 1793;
  • Generosity, as leniency-advocating Brigade General defeating Roman Catholic, royalist-sympathizing Vendéans at Cholet, LeMans, and Savenay, 1793;
  • Indomitability, as Egyptian expedition commander / governor and Syrian campaign commander to Napoléon Bonaparte (August 15, 1769 – May 5, 1821), 1798-;
  • Knowledge, as Isis Freemasonry Lodge Venerable Master, 1798.

A survivalist rose therefore honors a survivalist general.

 

Rosa 'Louis Gimard'

Jardin botanique de Montréal, Rosa 'Louis Gimard'
Jardin botanique de Montréal, Rosa 'Louis Gimard'

 

French and German influences likewise contribute to Louis Gimard old garden rose back-stories. For example, the given name Louis functions as the French form of the German name anciently known as Chlodowech (“glorious warrior”) and presently as Ludwig (“Lewis”). The last name Gimard has same-meaning origins in the Germanic words wig (“combat”) and mar (“illustrious”). Its floral application is thanks to Passins-born rosarian Jean Claude Pernet, père (October 15, 1832 – March 31, 1896), as:

  • Pupil of his father Joseph Pernet (père), a Cruvière-based rose cultivator;
  • Apprentice of Gillonnay-born Jean Baptiste Guillot, père (December 12, 1803 - April 18, 1882), La Guillotière-based nurseryman, 1837 - 1871;
  • Rose-breeding associate of Lyon-born rosarian Jean-Claude Ducher (1820 – January 24, 1874) in Palace of the Arts seedling exposition of June 16, 1845;
  • Rose-breeding business owner and operator, 1856-.

 

Parc de la Tête d'Or, located on Lyon Peninsula, proximitous to Jean Pernet's apprenticeship in La Guillotière and his own nursery in Villeurbanne, has featured a rose garden since 1805, with gift of roses from Empress Joséphine de Beauharnais.

Lyon Peninsula, central Lyon, east central France
Lyon Peninsula, central Lyon, east central France

 

Rosa ‘Louis Gimard’ behaves as valiantly as Rosa Général Kléber.  Louis Gimard roses demand minimal inputs even in difficult locations and poor soils. They nevertheless enjoy:

  • Full or partial sun;
  • Pruning of disfiguring branches after spring / summer bloom;
  • Slightly moist soil;
  • Soil pH of 5.5 – 7.5;
  • Temperatures between -30°C (-34.4°C) and 86°F (30°C).

They offer:

  • Arching, climbing canes;
  • Bristle-covered, crimson, lax-growing, slender stems;
  • Clustered, globular, pendant, 3.15-inch (8-centimeter) flowers with crimson-centered, 40+ double, full, grey pink-edged, lilac-toned, tight-packed, turned-back petals;
  • Dark green, oval, red-margined, shiny, thin, tooth-edged leaves;
  • Height and spread/width of 4.92 feet (1.5 meters) by 3.3 feet (1.01 meters);
  • Khaki moss-covered, pine-scented buds, receptacles, sepals, stalks;
  • Propagation by budding, cutting, grafting;
  • Strong, sweet fragrance.

 

 

Rosa 'Mme de la Roche-Lambert': one of most well-known Old Garden Mosses

Switzerland
Switzerland

 

Madame de la Roche-Lambert roses are not as strong-scented as Général Kléber and Louis Gimard roses. Their charmingly enduring, sweet fragrance nevertheless discourages deer just as much as do the more evident and human-tolerant aromas of their fellow old garden roses. But at the same time, they do not at all repel apian, human or lepidopteran admirers, what with:

  • Age-darkening, rough-surfaced, round leaves;
  • Arching, climbing, thorny canes;
  • Clustered, globular, light-cupped, mauve-pink, multi-petaled, pendant, short-stemmed, small-budded, 2.76-inch (7-centimeter) blooms with pale crimson undersides;
  • Feathery, light green moss-fringed, pine-scented buds, sepals, stems.

They exhibit mature heights and spreads/widths of 4.10 feet (1.25 meters) by 3.28 feet (1 meter).

Despite impressive pest-resistance, they may suffer from mildew powdering floral stems.

 

In 1851, Jean-Pierre Vibert (January 31, 1777 - January 18, 1866) sold his nursery in Angers, in northwestern France, to his chief gardener, Biarritz-born Mr. Robert: Rosa 'Mme de la Roche-Lambert' numbered among memorable roses bred by Mr. Robert ~

Old harbor, beach and lighthouse of Biarritz
Biarritz,  Pyrénées Atlantiques department: overlooks Bay of Biscay along southwestern France's Atlantic Coast
Biarritz, Pyrénées Atlantiques department: overlooks Bay of Biscay along southwestern France's Atlantic Coast

 

Like Général Kléber, Rosa ‘Madame de La Roche-Lambert’ commemorates Monsieur Robert’s rose-breeding experience and expertise. But Madame’s roses configure the Basque Country native’s earlier rose-breeding achievements. They date back to 1851. They honor Berthe Louise Adrienne de Thélusson (June 4, 1823 – October 13, 1913). Madame’s rose is a fitting tribute to:

  • The bride of Gabriel Joseph Marie de La Rochelambert-Montfort (December 23, 1812 – November 30, 1861) by a wedding ceremony conducted on July 6, 1841 in Paris;
  • The mother of six children (Henri [1842 – 1926], Laurence [1844 – 1876], Geneviève [1848 – 1920], Odette [1850 – 1873], Isabelle [1854 – 1911], and Françoise [1855 – 1929];
  • The occupant of Château de La Rochelambert, still standing in Auvergne on Saint Paulien’s basalt cliffs.

 

Château de la Rochelambert: namesake of Mr. Robert's Old Garden Moss rose

Saint-Paulien, dép. de la Haute-Loire, Auvergne, south central France
Saint-Paulien, dép. de la Haute-Loire, Auvergne, south central France

Conclusion

 

The fragrance, look, and palatability of old garden moss roses attract bees, birds, butterflies, and people but discourage deer.

  • Old garden moss roses in general and Général Kléber, Louis Gimard, and Madame de La Roche-Lambert’s roses in particular emit fresh, sweet, strong scents.
  • They harbor rough-surfaced leaves and stems.
  • Their edible parts -- hips, oils, petals, waters -- integrate deliciously and easily as fresh or processed flavorings or ingredients.
  • They lack the modern rose’s susceptibility to environmental stresses.
  • They overlap in no-fuss, no-muss cultivation and propagation.

So other than rare occurrences of aphids or mildew, they ramble, smell, and taste in ways which please apian, avian, human, and lepidopteran admirers, but repel deer (unless super-ailing or super-famished).

 

Gardeners are pleased to see a deer turning its back on roses.

West Hill, Devon, South West England
West Hill, Devon, South West England

Acknowledgment

 

My special thanks to:

  • Talented artists and photographers/concerned organizations who make their fine images available on the Internet;
  • Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University for superior on-campus and on-line resources.

 

c. 1870-1900 chromolithograph of Général Kléber printed by Donaldson Brothers of Five Points, New York:

Remembering the General via trade cards as well as roses.
19th Century American Trade Cards
19th Century American Trade Cards

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the end which is also the beginning
the end which is also the beginning

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DerdriuMarriner, All Rights Reserved.
DerdriuMarriner, All Rights Reserved.
Updated: 11/06/2014, DerdriuMarriner
 
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DerdriuMarriner on 11/12/2014

burntchestnut, Yes, habitat destruction skewers the traditional lifestyles of wildlife such as deer, etc. In their search for alternate and/or new food sources, they are not intending to be pests -- they are just seeking the basic necessities for life for them and their dear ones.
I'm happy that pastures border two sides of my yard, so the deer et al. have abundant food sources and my gardens are safe.

AngelaJohnson on 11/12/2014

Unfortunately with man taking over more and more of wild animals' habitat, deer, coyotes, raccoons and other animals have no choice but to look for food in yards and gardens. Of course, we'd rather they eat grass than flowers!

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