Louisiana and the American Revolutionary War

by blackspanielgallery

Louisiana had a significant role in the American Revolution, even though it was held by Spain at the time.

What possible connection could there be between Louisiana and the American Revolutionary War? As I probed into my ancestry I would find documents linking ancestors to the right to belong to such organizations as The Sons of the American Revolution or The Daughters of the American Revolution. These organizations require documented evidence of an ancestor participating in the American Revolutionary War. But, at the time of the American Revolution Louisiana was owned by Spain. At first I dismissed this as ancestors who sided with the colonists and crossed the border to participate. While a few may have, I eventually found that Louisiana had a significant role in the war.

The Great Upheaval

What has become known as the Great Upheaval was an event that would later have an influence in Louisiana participating in the war.  In the mid-eighteenth century there was an expulsion of French speaking people from Nova Scotia. 

 

For decades prior to the Great Upheaval the French-speaking Roman Catholics lived side by side with the British settlers in Nova Scotia.  Then, in the mid eighteenth century these people were rounded up and exiled, often separating families in the process. 

 

In 1865 Louisiana passed from French control to Spanish control.  At that time some of these exiles came as a group to Louisiana.  Governor Ulloa, the first Spanish governor of Louisiana, welcomed these persecuted people.  They were allowed to settle in Louisiana, and over the next few years more came. 

 

Why were these people exiled?  The British settlers had problems with the French speaking people, and their Roman Catholic religion.  It was a case of religious persecution.  The official reason given is these people refused to sign an oath of allegiance to King George III.  But, the refusal had happened long before the expulsion. 

 

This would later have an effect on Louisiana and the American Revolutionary War.

Galvez Becomes Governor

In the mid-1770s around the time of the revolt Spain sent Galvez, a military man, to be governor of Louisiana.  Spain helped the revolting colonies obtain supplies.  The Mississippi River with the Port of New Orleans was an excellent place to receive supplies destined for the revolting army, even though Britain had blockaded the Atlantic ports.

The Ilsenos

Shortly after the hostilities broke out in America, Spain decided to bolster its forces in Louisiana.  The plan was to recruit seven hundred troops from Spain’s southernmost province, the Canary Islands.  These people are now called Islenos, or island people.  The intent was to recruit families to help colonize Louisiana, so the goal was two thousand one hundred people, seven hundred of whom would be in the military. 

 

The recruitment went well, and eight ships embarked on the trip to Louisiana.  Of the eight ships, seven made it to their destination.  The eighth ship encountered a British fleet, and changed course.  It made port in Cuba.

 

The men who made it to Louisiana were stationed along the Mississippi River, downriver from New Orleans, to repel any British warships attempting to sail up the Mississippi River.  Others were positioned along the Gulf of Mexico as coast watchers.

The Spanish Involvement

Spain’s role to supply the colonial forces was the condition at the beginning of the war.  Eventually Spain declared war on Britain, allowing for a more active involvement.

The British

The British controlled Baton Rouge and Natchez, both along the Mississippi River past New Orleans.  In addition, the British were entrenched in locations along the Gulf of Mexico.

War Comes to Louisiana

Governor Galvez gathered some of his troops with the goal of freeing the Mississippi River of the British, and also clearing the British from the Gulf of Mexico.  This came after the Canary Islanders arrival, so his forces were somewhat stronger than before.

 

When Galvez began his march he was joined by six hundred volunteers.  These were the people who had been welcomed by Spain after the Great Upheaval.  They were people who had been wronged.  The religious persecution they had endured had swollen Galvez’ army into an impressive fighting force, and the garrisons against which he marched were ill equipped to resist his now expanded army. 

 

Galvez captured the British garrisons on both the Mississippi River and the Gulf of Mexico.

 

Did the Islenos on the French speaking people now called Cajuns, named for Acadia, have an impact?  Answering what would have happened is impossible, but Galvez did prevail.

 

Perhaps with less religious persecution by the British the colonies would not have obtained independence.

 

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The introduction image is our own.. 

Updated: 12/05/2018, blackspanielgallery
 
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blackspanielgallery 3 days ago

Some of his so-called "faults" are his strengths. We need someone who makes strong responses, which we did not have for a long time. The problem is Trump is brash in his delivery. So, some are offended. Yet, his environmental apptegy is problematic. Of course we can all do out individual part, and the importance of that is magnified with little national support.. I probably will never agree with any president one hundred percent of the time. The only way that could occur is if I became president, and I suppose it is the same for all. No, I have no such aspirations.

The problem with a third party in the U. S. is the electoral college. Only those few hundred votes matter, and since most states are winner take all third party votes will not win electoral college votes and are merely statements of objection. The argument Clinton followers used claiming she won the popular vote is erroneous, she also had less than half of the vote. Going back to Bill Clinton and onwards I do not recall a president having over fifty percent of the votes.

frankbeswick 3 days ago

I agree that the USA has problems. Like all people Trump has his faults and his strong points, and I don't dislike him, but if I were American I would probably vote for neither of the two big parties, but that's what I do at home in the UK, where I support a small third party.

blackspanielgallery 3 days ago

Problems abound in many nations. Here, it seems it does not matter which political party is in, there is no cooperation. While Trump is, my opinion, better than Clinton, the policies on environmental issues are not good. And our prices are soon expected to rise on many things as tariffs and reprisals for tariffs start a trade war. Yet the option seems to be less personal responsibility and a trend towards socialism. When options are all bad there is a problem, a serious problem.

Of course no one will be in total agreement with the government on all issues, but it seems we have to choose which half of important issues we really consider important when voting.

The U. K. is not unique in problems, we also have our share.

frankbeswick 3 days ago

This is the worst political mess that I have known in my sixty eight years. The government is totally incompetent.

Veronica 4 days ago

Especially after yesterday's government high drama, the UK is in a bad way.

The list below in Frank's comment is but a small number of issues. I am only 7+ years younger than Frank and I have never felt British.

frankbeswick 5 days ago

The UK has so many serious problems at the moment that the monarchy is merely side show. Brexit, poor people having to resort to food banks,homelessness, underfunded public services, police with inadequate numbers, all of these matter more than the triviality at the top.

blackspanielgallery 6 days ago

and the problem is worsened by a divide over whether a monarchy is outdated and should go away, and those who enjoy the pageantry.

frankbeswick 6 days ago

The problem is that while older people such as me have a British and an English identity, younger people are losing the sense of Britishness. That we have absolutely no festival celebrating Britishness does not help the situation.

Veronica 6 days ago

In that case, I would think that Britain has no national festivals as you describe.

Can any Brits think of any festivals we have which celebrate Britishness?

blackspanielgallery 7 days ago

By national holidays I mean something that one can celebrate that brings pride in one's heritage, sometimes not really an official holiday. The Irish have Saint Patrick's Day, for example. Here we have many cultures blended, and all are celebrated welcoming others to the celebration. I have always been curious why those of us with a British ancestry have none.

I asked the German group if about one-fourth German blood was enough to join, and was told I would not have to have any German bloodline. Just an interest is needed. That is how welcoming things are here.


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